Biden is Anti-Haiti, and His Haitian-American Press Person Doesn’t Give a Damn

Discussion in 'The Locker Room' started by loyola llothta, Jun 10, 2021.

  1. Bunchy Carter

    Bunchy Carter I'll Take The Money Over The Honey

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    Both sides are the same

    Trump called Haiti a shythole and Biden is Anti-Haiti...........Both sides are the same:mjgrin:
     
  2. Rhakim

    Rhakim Veteran Poster of the Year Supporter

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    The fukkery started way before he was elected, Haiti has had some awful rulers going back a long time with the USA specifically interfering with Haitian politics for over 100 years. For most of the decades from the 1950s through the 1980s they were ruled by a father-son dictator pair that had the entire country locked down running death squads to silence or kill all opponents and shyt. The only people who were doing well were the ultra-elite who were aligned with the dictators.

    Aristide came to prominence as a genuinely good guy, a priest who spoke out for the cause of the poor and who was willing to criticize those who acted in evil despite extreme risk to himself. He had a massive popular following throughout Haiti, especially among the poor, which helped lead to the miracle where they actually had a real election (the first in Haiti that I know about) and Aristide won in a landslide. That didn't mean things got better because the military and the elite and other allies of the former dictators were opposing him every step of the way and they still controlled a lot of the levers in Haiti. During the Bush administration the CIA continued to support certain factions inside Haiti and those factions assisted the military in orchastrating a military coup that knocked Aristide out of power. To make a long story short, massive public demonstrations and assistance from the Clinton Administration eventually got the Haitian military to back down, Aristide was able to return to power, he won another election in a landslide, and the the military threw another coup to knock him out of power again.

    Obviously it was very, very difficult to run the country effectively under those conditions. But the country hasn't been run effectively before or after Aristide either. So far as everyone I know in Haiti tells me, Aristide was by far the most well-intentioned of Haiti's rulers in our lifetime, one who truly had the best interests of the people at heart, and the masses in Haiti especially among the poor loved him.
     
  3. LinusCaldwell

    LinusCaldwell From The Eastside with Love

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    Yo momma :ufdup:
     
  4. Rhakim

    Rhakim Veteran Poster of the Year Supporter

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    US press was a tool against Aristide cause he was pro-poor, same as they spread lies and bullshyt against socialists and pro-poor leaders all across the world. Here's an essay that gets at the massive amount of bullshyt that was spread in US media about the Aristide regime. (I don't know anything about the author but his take seems legit to me from the other stuff I know.)

    #3679: Re: Enemy Ally: The Demonization of Aristide (fwd)

    Enemy Ally: The Demonization of Jean-Bertrand Aristide

    November/December 1994

    By Jim Naureckas

    Usually when the U.S. military intervenes overseas, the U.S. press demonizes the enemy. But in the case of the Haiti occupation, many media reports have spent more time demonizing the U.S.'s ostensible ally, deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

    Newsweek (9/26/94) described Aristide as "an anti-American demagogue, an unsteady left-wing populist who threatened private enterprise and condoned violence against his political opponents."

    An editorial in the liberal New York Newsday (9/21/94) proclaimed: "Aristide seems bent on proving his critics' claims: that he's a fickle ideologue, a rabble-rouser with a messianic complex essentially uninterested in the pragmatic realities and possibly incompetent to be chief exec."

    Fred Barnes on the McLaughlin Group (9/20/94) dismissed the fact that two-thirds of the Haitian population voted for Aristide: "The notion that because Aristide was once elected, that we now have to impose him, carries democratic formalism to an extreme....Hitler was elected."

    Disinformation Campaign

    Aristide has long been the target of a disinformation campaign, with CIA distortions sourced to the Haitian military being disseminated through the media by P.R. agents paid for by the Haitian elite (Extra!Update, 12/93). The key elements of the campaign have long been disproven, but they still keep coming up in coverage of the Haitian occupation.

    John McLaughlin provided one of the shriller summaries of the claims on the McLaughlin Group (9/20/94): "Aristide has been charged by eye-witnesses with criminal horrors, including assassination; complicity in the humiliation of the Papal Nuncio...and, most horribly, Aristide's exhorting of mobs to use necklacing, Haitian slang for gang execution with a gasoline-soaked tire put around the neck and set aflame, also called Pere Lebrun." McLaughlin then showed a video clip that he said showed "Aristide inciting a mob to Pere Lebrun with his lunatic sing-song chant."

    The assault against the Papal Nuncio, who was suspected of supporting an attempted coup, occurred before Aristide came to power, and Aristide was not involved. As for the alleged "Pere Lebrun" speech, it nowhere mentions necklacing, and seems in context to be referring to the Haitian constitution as a "beautiful tool." Despite the constant repetition of the claim that the spell-binding Aristide "exhorted mobs to use necklacing," there were no documented cases of necklacing from the day of Aristide's inauguration until the day of the coup.

    While the old charges linger on (Newsweek, 9/19/94, merged quotes from two different statements into "one angry speech" to make it seem like Aristide had called for necklacing), new disinformation is surfacing -- often based on the flimsiest of reporting.

    Time (9/26/94) ran an item on "a series of uncorroborated but sensational allegations that "Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti's erstwhile President, took hundreds of thousands of dollars in look-the-other-way money from Colombian drug cartels while in office."

    Not even Time claims that they have credible evidence for this: "None of the claims have been supported, and the sources may have suspect motives," the magazine admits. In reality, far from looking the other way, the ascetic Aristide instigated the first-ever serious crackdown on drug trafficking by the military -- whose involvement in the cocaine trade is well-documented.

    What could motivate Time editors to print such a dubious charge against Aristide? Time's standards were quite different when a reporter there tried to do a story in 1987 -- based on substantial documentation -- about drug smuggling by Oliver North's contra resupply network. After the article was repeatedly sent back for rewrites, the reporter told Extra! (11-12/91), a senior editor leveled with him: "Time is institutionally behind the contras. If this story were about the Sandinistas and drugs, you'd have no trouble getting it in the magazine."

    The Cherubin Smear

    Another Aristide smear involves his administration's Port-au-Prince police chief, Col. Pierre Cherubin, whose human rights record compares very favorably with others who have held that post - particularly compared to his self-appointed successor, Col. Michel Francois.

    But while Cherubin was in charge, five alleged "bandits" were murdered by Port-au-Prince police - a crime for which a subordinate of Cherubin's was arrested. Because of the new seriousness about human rights under Aristide, an investigation was launched to see if Cherubin himself had anything to do with the killings -- an investigation aborted by the 1991 coup.

    This incident has resurfaced in distorted form. The Washington Post's version of the charge (9/18/94) is that Cherubin was "authorizing torture and killing of Aristide's opponents." The Post's evidence? An anonymous U.S. government official provided a "classified assessment" that "concludes there is circumstantial evidence to suggest it could be true." If Woodward and Bernstein were dead, they'd be turning over in their graves.

    As with the children's game of Telephone, the charge becomes wilder with each retelling: John McLaughlin (9/20/94) refers to him as "Cherubin the torturer and the murderer."

    Why is this incident being re-examined now? Because Cherubin is Aristide's representative in trying to form a new police force. If Cherubin can be discredited, Aristide's influence over the new force may be greatly limited.

    Moral Equivalence

    It was difficult to whitewash the murderous Haitian military and police, who savagely beat demonstrators in plain view of U.S. cameras. (CBS's Dan Rather did make an honest effort, conducting a series of interviews with Gen. Raoul Cedras -- whom Rather referred to as "President Cedras" -- that concentrated on his patriotism, honor and love of family, and avoided any serious mention of his human rights abuses.) Instead, reports adopted the "balanced" approach of condemning equally the violence of Aristide and the military.

    "For two centuries, political opponents in Haiti have routinely slaughtered each other," wrote R.W. Apple in the New York Times (9/20/94). "Backers of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, followers of General Cedras and the former Tontons Macoute retain their homicidal tendencies, to say nothing of their weapons."

    "Everybody in both factions down there, both factions are shot through with slavering murderers," Jack Germond declared on the McLaughlin Group (9/20/94).

    This equation of the military and Aristide would seem ridiculous if news reports were accurately reporting on Aristide's human rights record. The number of killings dropped precipitously during Aristide's tenure: There were 53 murders in Haiti in the seven months he held office, including common non-political murders, spontaneous lynchings of criminal suspects, and killings by the military. A comprehensive Human Rights Watch report does not attribute direct responsibility for any of these murders to Aristide. Compare that with the estimated 3,000 killings by the military regime since Aristide's overthrow.

    Still, violence is treated as an endemic quality in Haitian life. "Vengeance, not voting, has been the Haitian way," reported Newsweek (9/26/94). Morton Kondracke (McLaughlin Group, 9/20/94) gave the same sentiment more of a racist spin: "Nobody is going to bring democracy to Haiti any time soon. This is a country soaked in blood -- primitive, backward, you know."

    Unnoticed fact: The per capita murder rate in the United States in a normal year is roughly nine times what it was in Haiti under Aristide's administration.

    Historic Revisionism

    R.W. Apple (New York Times, 9/20/94) suggested vaguely that Clinton's occupation would be "another futile attempt to reshape a society that has long resisted reform." But the absence of any real historical context was glaring in most U.S. coverage of the occupation.

    Occasionally reporters mentioned the 1915-1934 occupation as a "previous attempt to support democracy." But how many mentioned that the U.S. occupation dissolved the Haitian parliament, forced Haiti to accept a U.S.-written constitution that allowed foreign ownership of land, and reinstituted virtual slavery? (This and other information about Haitian history can be found in The Uses of Haiti, by Paul Farmer.)
     
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  5. Scott Larock

    Scott Larock Taking a much needed mental relaxation

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    class… not specific to a certain group people want a seat at the table them poor Haitians nothing to that woman.
     
  6. Swahili P'Bitek

    Swahili P'Bitek Absorbingpovertywithoutlimitations

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    Undermining the Haitian Revolution is one of the saddest things somebody can do. Do you know how difficult it is for a country of 500,000 slaves to fight off a country with a population of 20 million people, which means that the french could easily raise an army to send at their doorstep, which they did? Ask any group of people who have fought against imperialism in their own homeland vs a country with a larger population and they"ll tell you of the challenges, from the Irish to Angolans to Haitians. That war didn't last for 12 years just because. To make it worse the french were the strongest land military force in the world at that time, so you know how that goes. If it was just about the plantation owners, then it wouldn't have taken that long.
     
  7. CorporateTrapper

    CorporateTrapper Black Power. Black Business. #GMB

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    Another thing that doesnt get spoken about is the loyalty of the black women during the revolution.... The black women involved in the Haitian revolution were some of the greatest & most loyal women to ever live... we will never see shyt like that again.

    The French would capture wives and girlfriends, torture them, cut fingers off, starve them, beat them, and the women would never snitch.... they would never give up the secrets.

    Toussaints wife was locked up and lost almost 200 pounds from torture and starvation and she never spoke!!!

    Dessalines was running thru several women and had kids all over the country and his wife adopted all of them and stayed loyal even after his death :dead:

    The women would rather die with their men before they ever switched sides to the enemy.... some of the women were hanged right next to their men..... the stories are crazy man..... this is why the enemy is trying to hi-jack the minds of our women..... because we are unstoppable when we work together.

    thats why the feminist propaganda is so dangerous.
     
  8. HarlemHottie

    HarlemHottie Uptown Thoroughbred

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    This system is called 'reste avec' (written in french not kreyol bc i speak standand French and thats how i remembered it).
     
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  9. $cam-U-Well_Jack$on

    $cam-U-Well_Jack$on Superstar

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    Word to Jean Zombi.
     
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  10. loyola llothta

    loyola llothta ☭☭☭

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    @CubanVoodooBreh

    If you want to know more about what happen in Haiti get this book:

    Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracyin Haiti” by Jen Sprague

    If you really what to know about the 2004 coup and what happen in the 2000s watch the doc:
    Haiti: We Must Kill the Bandits”






    if you want to know what’s happen week by week in Haiti about the US puppet Haiti government listen to this Kreyòl and English station:

    June 5, 2021:
    DEKANTASYON: Deconstructing events in #Haiti - June 5, 2021
    On today's show we discuss the violence in Martissant, where gangs are fighting over the lucrative spoils of corruption in Haiti and more.
    (New radio show discussing events and people in Haiti Smash up of Kreyòl and English)




    May 29, 2021:
    DEKANTASYON: Deconstructing events in #Haiti - May 29, 2021: Haitians protest in US, France & Canada against illegal June 27 referendum. The origins of The Little Machete Army in #Haiti and the #PHTK regime of Jovenel Moise. Who is Gonzague Day & his infamous Duvalierist dad? (New radio show discussing events and people in Haiti Smash up of Kreyòl and English)



    May 22, 2021:
    DEKANTASYON: Deconstructing events in #Haiti - Sat., May 22, 2021 We visit protests in France & New York against the June 27th referendum to change Haiti's constitution being pushed by the #PHTK government of
    @moisejovenel. Gang leader Jimmy Cherizier, aka BBQ, has offered to provide security for the referendum in Port au Prince stating, "We either have a referendum to change the constitution or we have a civil war"! We also look at Columbia's attempt to use Haiti to improve the image of its police who have been going on a killing spree against anti-government protests in its own country. Finally, we're joined by legendary singer and activist Farah Juste for a discussion about events in Haiti. (New radio show discussing events and people in Haiti Smash up of Kreyòl and English.)




    May 15, 2021:
    DEKANTASYON: Deconstructing events in #Haiti - May 15, 2021. Remittances reach all time high, new commission to solve ongoing crisis in Haiti, progressive organizations in the DR declare former PHTK president Michel Martelly persona non grata a day before he plays at Hard Rock in Santo Domingo. We're also joined by Tony Jean-Thenor with Veye-Yo, an organization for Haitian rights founded by Father Gerard Jean-Juste in Miami, Florida. (New radio show discussing events and people in Haiti Smash up of Kreyòl and English)




    May 8, 2021
    DEKANTASYON: Deconstructing Events in Haiti - May 8, 2021 Discussion of Juan Gabriel Valdes, Ronald Sanders and the international community weighing in on the situation in Haiti (New radio show discussing events and people in Haiti Smash up of Kreyòl and English.)


    Audio:


    Apr 24, 2021
    DEKANTASYON: Deconstructing events in #Haiti - Apr. 24, 2021 with guest Maud Jean-Michel and featuring KAFENOL from Montreal (New radio show discussing events and people in Haiti Smash up of Kreyòl and English.)

     
  11. Deus

    Deus I'm the REAL Zucotti Manicotti Supporter

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    Haitians need to grab their own gourds

    :yeshrug:
     
  12. BaviKingVA

    BaviKingVA I told you I'd shoot, but you didn't believe me... Supporter

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    that's fukked up.

    still not voting republican
     
  13. jerzboy

    jerzboy Superstar

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  14. KingZimbabwe

    KingZimbabwe Superstar

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    Exactly my point - in a thread referencing a HAITIAN AMERICAN as an AMERICAN.

    They tend to reflect a particular world view. You know better than I, but you know exactly what I’m talking about no reason to act brand new. There’s a reason why Biden is allowed to pull this shyt with complete silence from a Haitian in his own cabinet.

    You could label it “different priorities” - but I call it what it is, c00ning.

    Keyword were nothing to take away from the history of Haitian people. But their entire country has been in turmoil for hundreds of years.

    At least the ones with enough capital to move to the US tend to reflect a certain worldview :mjpls:

    People can ignore it all they want - but it can only be addressed if it is called out.

    Obviously that’s not what I’m talking about, context clues breh this isn’t the 1700s anymore and I’m not even talking about Haitians IN Haiti when the whole thread is about how Biden is OPENLY ANTI HAITIAN. Yet a person in his OWN ADMINISTRATION with the power to call him out and stop the further destruction and exploitation of their own country is silent. They are silent for a reason.
    :unimpressed:
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2021
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  15. Father

    Father Superstar Supporter

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    @Swahili P'Bitek @CorporateTrapper
    No
    Epidemics have been pivotal in the history of the world as exemplified by a yellow fever epidemic in the Caribbean that clearly altered New World geopolitics. By the end of the 18th century, yellow fever--then an "emerging disease"--was widespread throughout the Caribbean and particularly lethal in Saint-Domingue (present day Haiti). From 1793 to 1798, case fatality rates among British troops in the West Indies (including Saint-Domingue) were as high as 70%. A worse fate befell newly arrived French armed forces in 1802, ostensibly sent by Napoleon to suppress a rebellion and to reestablish slavery. Historians have disagreed on why Napoleon initially dispatched nearly 30,000 soldiers and sailors to the island. Evidence suggests the troops were actually an expeditionary force with intensions to invade North America through New Orleans and to establish a major holding in the Mississippi valley. However, lacking knowledge of basic prevention and control measures, mortality from the disease left only a small and shattered fraction of his troops alive, thwarting his secret ambition to colonize and hold French-held lands, which later became better known as the Louisiana Purchase. If an event of the magnitude of France's experience were to occur in the 21st century, it might also have profound unanticipated consequences.

    The 1802 Saint-Domingue yellow fever epidemic and the Louisiana Purchase - PubMed


    @CorporateTrapper you don't live in Haiti, you live in AMERICA.
    When shyt really popped off (Cacos wars), none of that revolutionary spirit made a difference. nikkas got 200-2 bodybagged multiple times and had to run up under the ppl that did it. Go home or shut up about liberation, you living in the country that came through and made sure liberation ENDED.
     

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