RUSSIA Thread: Wikileaks=FSB front, UKRAINE?, SNOWED LIED; NATO Aggression; Trump = Putins B!tch

Discussion in 'Higher Learning' started by 4d 6f 6e 65 79, Sep 30, 2015.

  1. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    IVE BEEN VINDICATED!


    Total, and absolute, vindication :mjcry:



    I'm owed an apology... :wow:






    UPDATE:








    Wikileaks is a Front for Russian Intelligence

    Wikileaks is a Front for Russian Intelligence


    August 31, 2015

    The part played by Wikileaks in the Edward Snowden saga is an important one. The pivotal role of Julian Assange and other leading members of Wikileaks in getting Snowden from Hawaii to Moscow, from NSA employment to FSB protection, in the late spring of 2013 is a matter of record.

    For years there have been questions about just what Wikileaks actually is. I know because I’ve been among those asking. Over two years ago, little more than two weeks after Snowden landed in Moscow, I explained my concerns about Wikileaks based on my background in counterintelligence. Specifically, the role of the Russian anti-Semite weirdo Israel Shamir, a close friend of Assange, in the Wikileaks circle merited attention, and to anyone trained in the right clues, the Assange group gave the impression of having a relationship with Russian intelligence. As I summed up my position in July 2013, based on what we knew so far:

    It’s especially important given the fact that Wikileaks is playing a leading role in the Snowden case, to the dismay of some of Ed’s admirers and even members of his family. Not to mention that Snowden, as of this writing, is still in Moscow. One need not be a counterintelligence guru to have serious questions about Shamir and Wikileaks here. It may be a much bigger part of the story than it appears to the naked eye.

    Evidence that Wikileaks is not what it seems to be has mounted over the years. Assange’s RT show didn’t help matters, neither did the fact that, despite having claimed to possess secret Russian intelligence files, Wikileaks has never exposed anything sensitive, as they have done with the purloined files of many other countries. To say nothing of Assange & Co. taking unmistakably pro-Russian positions on a host of controversial issues. Questions logically followed.

    Now answers are appearing. It’s long been known that Wikileaks, by their own admission, counseled Ed Snowden in June 2013 to leave Hong Kong and head to Moscow. Contrary to the countless lies propagated by Snowden Operation activists, Snowden’s arrival in Russia was his choice; it had nothing to do with canceled passports in Washington, DC.

    An important gap has been filled this week by Julian Assange, who admitted that Snowden going to Moscow was his idea. Ed wanted to head to Latin America, Julian asserted, especially Ecuador, whose London embassy Assange has been hiding out in for years on the lam from rape changes in Sweden.
    As Assange explained, “He preferred Latin America, but my advice was that he should take asylum in Russia despite the negative PR consequences, because my assessment is that he had a significant risk he could be kidnapped from Latin America on CIA orders. Kidnapped or possibly killed.”

    Only in Russia would Ed be safe, Julian counseled, because there he would be protected by Vladimir Putin and his secret services, notably the FSB. One might think that seeking the shelter of the FSB — one of the world’s nastiest secret police forces that spies on millions without warrant and murders opponents freely — might be an odd choice for a “privacy organization.” But Wikileaks is no ordinary NGO.

    Why Assange knew Russia would take in Snowden — it could be a big political hassle for Moscow — is a key question that any counterintelligence officer would want answered.
    Was Julian speaking on behalf of the FSB or did he just “know” Ed could obtain the sanctuary plus protection he sought?

    Just as telling is the recent report on Assange’s activities in Ecuador’s London embassy, where it turns out Ecuadorian intelligence has been keeping tabs on him. Which is no surprise given the PR mess Assange has created for Ecuador with his on-going antics.

    Especially interesting is the revelation that, while holed up in London, Assange “requested that he be able to chose his own Security Service inside the embassy, suggesting the use of Russian operatives.” It is, to say the least, surpassingly strange that a Western “privacy advocate” wants Russian secret police protection while hiding out in a Western country. The original Spanish is clear: Assange “habría sido la elección de su propio Servicio de Seguridad en el interior de la embajada, llegando a proponer la participación de operadores de nacionalidad rusa.”

    Why Assange wants FSB bodyguards is a question every journalist who encounters Julian henceforth should ask.
    Until he explains that, Wikileaks should be treated as the front and cut-out for Russian intelligence that it has become, while those who get in bed with Wikileaks — many Western “privacy advocates” are in that group — should be asked their feelings about their own at least indirect ties with Putin’s spy services.

    P.S. For those familiar with espionage history, there is a clear precedent for such an arrangement. In 1978 the magazine Covert Action Information Bulletin appeared to expose the secrets of US and Western intelligence. Its editor was Phil Agee, a former CIA officer who had gotten into bed with Cuban and Soviet intelligence; think of Agee as the Snowden of the pre-Internet era. CAIB was in fact founded on the direction of the KGB and for years served as a conduit for Kremlin lies and disinformation that seriously harmed Western intelligence. While CAIB presented itself as a radical truth-telling group, in actuality it was a KGB front, though few CAIB staffers beyond Agee knew who was really calling the shots. One suspects much the same is happening with Wikileaks.








    :lupe: Despite what you think about privacy laws, it seems that Snowden has A LOT to answer for and I find it funny Assange has never leaked anything about Russia :ohhh:
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  2. 88m3

    88m3 Fast Money & Foreign Objects

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    I think there that would be rational conclusion to draw
     
  3. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    The more I read, Im' starting to find Assange looking a little suspect.

    Dude is ALWAYS anti-western but you rarely read shyt about Russia or China post 2010. Not a fukking peep.

    Dude had a show on Russia Today?

    He had connects in russia for snowden?
     
  4. Ill

    Ill All Star

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  5. 88m3

    88m3 Fast Money & Foreign Objects

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    Yeah, maybe it didn't start off that way for Assange but at this point either his network and perhaps himself are corrupted by state intelligence of a hostile government.

    None of these guys really have any idea what info they actually have either.

    A lot of the stuff that's been released was done so to cause discord between NATO powers. It's relatively sophisticated ie: release on US spying, then German spying on xyz, French spying on xyz, 5 Eyes complicity in spying on xyz.

    Snowden is clearly an asset of Russian security and possibly always was.
     
  6. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    Be honest. Why do you reject this theory? Its by a guy who is a former intel officer and who is a leading voice among geopolitical analysis.

    Its not that far fetched if you understand who Phillip Agee was Philip Agee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  7. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    @¢apitali$t Migraine @DEAD7
    @Domingo Halliburton @Ill @88m3 @hashmander @Skooby @Maddmike @LeyeT @mbewane @Leasy @el_oh_el

    peep this shyt....

    I'm starting to find Assange's entire M.O. very suspect. I never even made the connection between his RT show and his supposed connections within moscow.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2015
  8. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    @88m3 @Ill



    :patrice:

    Why would he do this? See why this is low-key making sense? :jbhmm:

    Why are all of his targets NATO based? :lupe:
     
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  9. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    Has Wikileaks Been Infiltrated by Russian Spies?
    Leak group has a troubling history with the Kremlin


    It might sound strange, but has Wikileaks been infiltrated by Russia’s Federal Security Bureau, the post-Soviet successor to the KGB? Based on media accounts and first person testimonies, there are signs that Edward Snowden’s flight to Russia, eventually seeking asylum there, was organized by Russian intelligence. So was his defection a Russian intel op?

    Answering that question can be difficult — after all, none of the parties involved would simply announce such a thing. Moreover, Snowden seems to have made the decision to leak his cache of documents independently of any sympathy with Russia. Nevertheless, the chain of events leading up to Snowden’s flight, and his decision in Hong Kong to flee to Russia, of all places, strongly suggest that Russian intel has co-opted him to a remarkable degree.

    Wikileaks’ ties to the Russian government
    Many people object to the idea that Wikileaks is not a “pure,” public-interest based organization. After all, that is the official line out of Wikileaks itself, told mostly by Julian Assange. But Assange has some curious ties to the Russian government that bear exploring.

    Most obvious is his show on RT, the Kremlin-funded propaganda network. Called “The World Tomorrow,” its first 12 episodes featured a ragtag bunch of terrorists and lefties — and even endorsed Ecuadorian president Raphael Correa’s increasingly violent crusade to end free media in his country. Not coincidentally, Ecuador and Russia enjoy increasingly close relations.

    Assange taped his show from the Ecuadorian embassy in London and has been offered asylum in Ecuador should he ever be able to leave without risking arrest from British authorities.

    Assange got his Kremlin show after he threatened to publish embarrassing documents on Russia’s political elite in 2010, but relented after an FSB official hinted at violent reprisal against Wikileaks. Those documents were never published.

    Months later, Israel Shamir, a Belarussian anti-Semite who publicly identifies himself as Wikileaks’ Russian-language representative, sent a tranche of documents about democracy activists to Belarussian tyrant Alexander Lukashenko. He was selling them for a reported $10,000.

    Though Wikileaks denies even a connection to Shamir, former Wikileaks employees have written that their close association sparked controversy.


    Wikileaks’ ties to Snowden journalists
    After being repeatedly threatened in 2010, banks and credit card companies declined to process any donations for Wikileaks. By the end of 2012 Wikileaks was running perilously short on cash. A new U.S.-based group, the Freedom of the Press Foundation, launched with the explicit purpose of funneling cash to Wikileaks.

    On its board of directors are Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, the two journalists to whom Snowden chose to leak his documents. In an interview with Harper’s, Greenwald, the only human being followed by the Wikileaks account and a long-time defender and correspondent of Assange, says Snowden initially emailed him around the same time this foundation launched. He says he initially ignored them.

    The next month, Snowden contacted Poitras. In an interview with Salon, she noted that her previous involvement with Wikileaks for a film had given her the knowledge to effectively use encryption to hide her communications from most forms of surveillance.

    Still, being fellow ideological travelers is not evidence of any malign intent. But the close relationship between Greenwald and Poitras and Wikileaks shows why Wikileaks became involved so early in the Snowden saga.

    Wikileaks co-opts Snowden
    Snowden began downloading documents in April of 2012 — anywhere between 20,000 and 50,000. Working as a National Security Agency systems administrator, he had the ability to create false network accounts and impersonate others, even senior officials. Far from “brilliant,” as some anonymous sources call him, that is standard for a sysadmin.

    Over the next few years, he used government money to finance his training as a hacker. Then, when Snowden took his job as an infrastructure analyst with Booz Allen, his duty was to probe network security for weaknesses, which would complicate any security review of his activity. He could explain away suspicious behavior as being his job description.

    In a way, Snowden was the perfect infiltrator: trusted, technically savvy, strategically minded and thinking long term. He is a goldmine to any intelligence service interested in circumventing, spoofing, avoiding, defeating or delegitimizing American espionage.

    Once he was outside the familiar world of IT and U.S. agencies, real world politics seemed to stump him. He was reportedly terrified of losing access to the Internet. He did not seem to have any real escape plan when he went public in Hong Kong — rather than fleeing immediately to a friendly consulate where he could seek asylum, Snowden instead made the inexplicable decision to travel to Moscow.

    In Hong Kong, a series of events happened, one right after the other, that suggest a deliberate move by Wikileaks to deliver Snowden to Russia. First, Snowden revealed himself, through Poitras and Greenwald, as the leaker on June 9. The next day Assange publicly praised him as a hero, and Snowden checked out of his hotel to whereabouts unknown.

    Then on June 11, Russian Pres. Vladimir Putin offered to consider his asylum request. On June 19, Wikileaks said it was offering Snowden “legal counsel” and helping him “broker” his asylum in Iceland.

    At about the same time, according to a new article in Kommersant, Snowden was staying in the Russian consulate in Hong Kong (rumors say at Russia’s request), where he also celebrated his 30th birthday. On June 21, a Reutersstory datelined in Reykjavik quoted Olafur Vignir Sigurvinsson, an Icelandic businessman with close ties to Wikileaks, as saying he had prepared a private aircraft to take Snowden directly from Hong Kong to Iceland for asylum.

    Yet on June 23 Snowden was on a flight to Havana through Moscow.

    Cuba? Really?
    Snowden’s alleged selection of Cuba for asylum was a curious choice. If Wikileaks was “brokering” his asylum in Iceland, and a wealthy businessman had already offered private transport there, why wouldn’t he take it?

    Although traditionally known as a haven for fugitives fleeing American justice, in recent years Havana has been much more amenable to extraditingAmerican criminals. Under Raul Castro, Cuba has even made progress in re-opening migration between the two countries, a huge deal for both capitals.

    The decision by Cuba to reject Snowden shouldn’t have come as a surprise, especially considering that Michael Ratner, a lawyer for Wikileaks and Assange, has been deeply involved in Cuban politics for a years. Maybe Cuba under Raul considered the thaw in relations with the U.S. more important than a single fugitive.

    And if Snowden was trying to get to Havana, then the incident in which Bolivian Pres. Evo Morales’ plane was supposedly “grounded” in Austria makes little sense. Why would he be traveling to La Paz? Would Morales have conceivably been transporting Snowden to Havana on his way farther south?


    [​IMG]
    Snowden’s handwritten application for Russian asylum. Anatoly Kucherena
    Russian operation? The pieces fit
    When Snowden landed at the Sheremetyevo airport in Moscow on June 23, Putin was surprised. “It was completely unexpected for us,” he told reporters. But it is difficult to square that statement with the Kommersantreport alleging Snowden’s days-long stay in the Russian consulate — or even Putin’s statement earlier in June that he would welcome Snowden’s asylum.

    The Wall Street Journal reported that Snowden’s decision to travel through Moscow was “very sudden,” happening under the advisement of Wikileaks. It also reported that Wikileaks said it was helping Snowden travel to Russia. Wikileaks even Tweeted it, dubiously describing Russia and Cuba as “democratic.” Izvestia reported that Russian intelligence operatives collaborated with Wikileaks to exfiltrate Snowden from Hong Kong to Moscow.

    Upon his arrival at Sheremetyevo, Olga Bychkova, a host from the radio station “Echo of Moscow,” told Anna Nemtsova that she ”saw about twenty Russian officials, supposedly FSB [security service] agents in suits, crowding around somebody in a restricted area of the airport.”

    “The Kremlin pretends they have nothing to do with him being stuck in Moscow,” she continued, “but in reality they’re all over him.”

    After spending weeks with Sarah Harrison, Wikileaks’ mysterious “legal adviser” — who, according to Kommersant, arranged Snowden’s trip to Moscow — Snowden called a press conference filled with a mixture of human rights groups and Kremlin-funded officials to announce his decision to seek asylum in Russia.

    After that press conference, he apparently reached out to Anatoly Kucharena, a Muscovite lawyer who also happens to sit on the Public Council of the FSB, which is selected and vetted by the head of the FSB.

    Kucharena later told reporters he was responsible for handling Snowden’s money while he was stuck at the airport.


    [​IMG]
    Wikileaks’ Snowden-brand t-shirt. Wikileaks.spreadshirt.com
    A brilliant op
    From the public accounts, it looks like Snowden began as an earnest if misguided dissident looking to make his mark as a major leaker of national security secrets. But from the moment he arrived in Hong Kong, it is also clear that Wikileaks played a powerful role in shaping his decisions, behavior and even public statements — which is why the group has posted so many of them on its Website.

    At the same time, Wikileaks’ long and growing involvement with the Russian government is also difficult to ignore — and the immediate co-optation of Snowden by FSB agents in Moscow makes the entire move look like a well-planned operation.

    Pretending Wikileaks did not deliver Snowden to the FSB requires ignoring a preponderance of evidence to the contrary. It makes Wikileaks’ gratitudeto the Russian people — and thus, government — seem almost farcical. It might also explain why the Russian siloviki union, which contains former Russian intel and military officials, offered Snowden money and support.

    There’s also no question Wikileaks has profited handsomely from the affair. Just months after teetering on the verge of bankruptcy, in July the organization announced it was raising nearly a thousand Euros a day, which is close to its peak fundraising in 2010.

    So maybe working so closely with Russia wasn’t such a bad idea, after all — Wikileaks has lived to fight another day.

    This story has been revised slightly to emphasize that our assertions are conjecture.

    Subscribe to War is Boring: medium.com/feed/war-is-boring.
     
  10. franknitty711

    franknitty711 Pro

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    :patrice:this is a reach at best. I respect it tho
     
  11. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    Read about Phillip Agee. Will blow your mind.
     
  12. Ill

    Ill All Star

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    Wikileaks is not a secret FSB project :beli:

    Neither Assange nor Snowden were Russian assets before their respective situations blew up.

    Assange and Snowden are hackers who disagree with the actions that the US government has taken. That doesn't make them Russian sympathizers or spies.

    The logical security solution would be to seek out protection from a nation that can go toe to toe with the US and naturally that would be Russia.

    Are they working with the FSB now? Of coarse, but they're not working FOR them.
     
  13. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    So this proves the thesis. The FSB is certainly playing Wikileaks at this point, no?

    This doesn't mean Assange is a direct asset originally...but he seems to be NOW and this is what I'm addressing.

    And Assange is absolutely a Russian sympathizer. Read some of dudes points. Not to mention his behavior of wikileaks towards anything in Russia.
     
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  14. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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    @Ill needs to come around :sas2:
     
  15. 4d 6f 6e 65 79

    4d 6f 6e 65 79 Veteran Hall of Shame Supporter

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