Essential Afro-Latino/ Caribbean Current Events

Discussion in 'The Root' started by Poitier, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. Poitier

    Poitier My Words Law Supporter

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    We have an African thread so why not keep an updated thread on our brehs and brehettes in Latin America/ Carribean :yeshrug:

    I think its important to bridge the gap in knowledge between Black Americans and Afro-Latinos/Carribeans. Countries like Jamaica, Trinidad, DR, Panama, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba and Puerto Rico have huge Black populations... over 112 million Black folk..huge consumer base with rich culture....the potential if Black America linked up with them for business is too huge not to research further.

    I know many people have traveled to many of these countries for the women and scenery but I'd like the focus to also be:

    1. Photos and videos of areas with high concentration of Afro-Latinos/Carribeans

    2. Investment opportunities- real estate, private investment, stock exchanges

    3. Media- music, movies, etc

    4. Social media- links to Afro-Latino/Carribeans sites and networks

    5. Trade- What business and trade deals are these Caribbean and Hispanic countries making with other countries



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    @blackzeus @Tommy Knocks @GreatestLaker @Malta @4fossa @KidStranglehold @Angelic Servers if yall have any photos, news, sites, articles, graphs, youtube videos to get this started, it would be appreciated.

    @2Quik4UHoes if you have any good info on the Rastas in Ethiopia, that would be :thumbsup:

    @cook @concise @Always-Right Liggins @midwesthiphop @BarNone can we get a sticky?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2014
  2. Poitier

    Poitier My Words Law Supporter

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    Brazil's presidential election
    Marina gains momentum
    Aug 30th 2014, 6:43 by J.P. | SÃO PAULO

    • [​IMG]
      “A PASSING wave.” That is how Aécio Neves, the presidential candidate of the centre-right Party of Brazilian Social Democracy (PSDB), earlier this week dismissed the rising popularity of Marina Silva. Ms Silva was propelled to the top of the centrist Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB) ticket in the wake of the tragic death in a plane crash two weeks ago of its leader and candidate, Eduardo Campos. “Groundswell” would have been a more appropriate description. Nor does it look like dissipating any time soon.

      Support for Ms Silva, a former environment minister and green activist, has surged from 21% in the days immediately following the accident to 34%, according to a poll published on August 29th by Datafolha. With five weeks left before the election this pushes Mr Neves into distant third and puts Ms Silva neck and neck with President Dilma Rousseff, who had until now enjoyed a healthy first-round lead. In a second-round run-off, the Datafolha poll has Ms Silva beating the incumbent by ten percentage points.

      The poll numbers can be explained in part by the spotlight shone on Ms Silva since Mr Campos’s death. She has been gazing upon voters from covers of most newspapers and magazines. Brazilians—20m of whom plumped for her in the 2010 presidential election, when she came a solid third—have been constantly reminded of her remarkable life story: a poor rubber-tappers’ daughter who only learned to read at 16 but went on to become a world-renowned environmentalist. On August 27th she was interviewed on Brazil’s main evening news, watched every night by an average of 36m people.

      But there is more to Ms Silva’s rise than mere media exposure. For one thing, she has used the attention well. During the TV interview, for instance, contrary to her reputation as something of a radical, she came across as calm and measured, if somewhat vague. The previous night she had delivered a similarly robust performance in the first televised debate, helped by Mr Neves’s and Ms Rousseff’s insistence on trading mutual barbs while apparently forgetting that she is now the biggest threat to both of them. That allowed Ms Silva to strike a conciliatory note and reinforce her message of a “third way” between Mr Neves’s PSDB and the left-wing Workers’ Party (PT) of the president. That stance is appealing to the 70% of Brazilians who tell pollsters they crave change.

      Then, on August 29th, Ms Silva’s nebulous notion of renewal gained flesh when she unveiled her detailed government programme in São Paulo. The 250-page document, mostly elaborated together with Mr Campos before his death, is replete with sensible policies. On economics it reads much like Mr Neves’s business-friendly platform. Proposals include tax reform, fiscal discipline, flexible exchange rates and robust inflation targeting by an independent central bank—all of which the PT has been accused of forsaking, with dire consequences: official GDP figures released earlier in the day showed Brazil sliding into recession in the second quarter.

      The programme also brought a number of welcome surprises. It advocates gay marriage, seemingly at odds with Ms Silva’s devout Pentacostalism, and praises hydropower, expansion of which she had opposed on environmental grounds as minister in the government of Ms Rousseff’s predecessor and mentor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, between 2003 and 2008. Mr Neves and Ms Rousseff will surely intensify their attacks on Ms Silva from now on. But events of the past two weeks have made it harder to paint Ms Silva as a dangerous radical unprepared to govern. The wave may be hard to stop.

      http://www.economist.com/blogs/americasview/2014/08/brazils-presidential-election-0
     
  3. Poitier

    Poitier My Words Law Supporter

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    Just a lil eye candy to inaugurate this thread creation :banderas:
     
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  4. Malta

    Malta Sweetwater Hall of Fame

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    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Diasporan Royalty

    Diasporan Royalty Wholesome Negro Staff Member Poster of the Year

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  6. Malta

    Malta Sweetwater Hall of Fame

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  7. My UZI Weighs A T.O.N

    My UZI Weighs A T.O.N Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Sticky done. I like this thread
     
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  8. 4fossa

    4fossa All Star

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    Great thread. Ill contribute as soon as possible
     
  9. Poitier

    Poitier My Words Law Supporter

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    March Against Black Genocide galvanizes 50,000 people throughout Brazil; where is the media coverage?

    [​IMG]
    Marches Against Black Genocide on August 22nd took place all over Brazil

    Note from BW of Brazil: Here at BW of Brazil, the consistent pattern of genocide being carried out against the black population of Brazil has long been a topic of concern. Whether being killed in day to day violence, by Military Police (MP) in actions of which the policy seems to be “shoot first and ask questions later”, esquadrões da morte (death squads whose hit men are often composed of off-duty MPs) or victims of the stray bullets fired in majority black neighborhoods, the bodies continue to stack up. In the United States, the repercussions of the murder of the unarmed black teen Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri has gained international attention. Brown’s murder at the hands of police was only one of a number of unarmed black men who have been killed by police in the US over the past several weeks as the blatant assault on the black community seems to be reaching a boiling point in that country. But, as the numbers pointed 0ut on a post here a few years ago, the situation is still much worse in Brazil.

    As Jonathan Watts of The Guardian wrote on August 29th: “Although Brazil has a population that is a third smaller than that of the US, it has almost five times as many killings by police. And though the vast majority of the victims are black or mixed race, there is far less of a debate about race.” So as the general population continues to go on with the day to day as if nothing is strange is going on, thousands took to the streets all over Brazil on Friday, August 22nd to express their outrage at this disregard for life, particularly against those of darker skin. As such, the question is, where is the international media? In the march that took place in São Paulo, a large sign carried throughout the march showed solidarity with African-Americans in the death of Mike Brown. (Sign in photo below: “We are all Mike Brown. For the end of the police”). But is Mike Brown’s death more important that the deaths of Raissa Vargas Motta, the mother/daughter pair of Maria de Fátima dos Santos and Alessandra de Jesus, the infamous murder of Cláudia da Silva Ferreira and too many black Brazilian men and youth to name here? The struggle is the same throughout the African Diaspora. The media coverage should be also!

    March Against Black Genocide galvanizes 50,000 people and has repercussions abroad

    by Dojival Vieira

    [​IMG]
    Brasília – the struggle against racism in the nation’s capital

    At least 50,000 people took to the streets across the country in the Second National March Against the Genocide of Black People that took place on Friday (August 22) in at least 10 states and in 15 countries had repercussions in 15 countries, according to initial estimates of the organizers. The protest had its strength in cities like Salvador, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, Vitória, Belo Horizonte, Porto Alegre and Manaus, with demonstrations that altered the routines of these cities.

    In São Paulo, about a thousand people gathered at the MASP museum on Avenida Paulista to participate in the demonstration, according to estimates of their own Military Police. The march down the avenue toward Consolação street in the direction of the Municipal Theatre downtown, where in 1978, one of the oldest institutions of the Movimento Negro Brasileiro (black Brazilian movement), the Movimento Negro Unificado contra a Discriminação Racial (MNU or Unified Black Movement against Racial Discrimination) began activity.

    [​IMG]
    Rio Grande do Sul – The cause brought people to the march in the capital city of Porto Alegre

    Brasília

    In Brasília, the demonstration took place in Zumbi dos Palmares Square, in Conic, and brought together about 400 people according to estimates of the Military Police of the Federal District. The rally in the federal capital brought together representatives of social movements, religious groups, artists and people who face racism on a daily basisand marching through the streets surrounding the Rodoviária de Brasília, one of the busiest areas in town, where buses depart to other administrative regions of the Federal District and surrounding areas.

    “The objective of the march is to give visibility to the issue. Who is marching here are the people of the periphery, of the settlements. Want to give a turn to those who are on the margins, who don’t speak,” said one of the organizers, Layla Marisandra, of the Fórum da Juventude Negra (Black Youth Forum). “In the DF (Federal District), it’s no different from other states. Here we have an invisible cord that divides the [south and north] wings of the surroundings and the satellite [cities]. There’s a population that only go downtown to work.”

    Police violence

    [​IMG]
    São Paulo – In the capital city, people marched not only for Afro-Brazilians but also in solidarity with fight for justice in the murder of African-American youth Mike Brown

    In São Paulo, the protesters shouted slogans against police violence affecting primarily the black and poor in Brazil. “Black death today, in Brazil, has reached the numbers of a civil war. Every 25 minutes a black person dies in this country,” said National Coordinator of the Movimento Quilombo, Raça e Classe (Quilombo Movement, Race and Class), Tamires Rizzo.

    According to the Mapa da Violência 2014 (Map of Violence 2014) report, proportionally, 146.5% more blacks died than whites in Brazil in 2012, in situations such as homicides, traffic accidents or suicide. Between 2002 and 2012, these numbers have more than doubled, according to the study by the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences, with support from the Secretariat for the Promotion of Racial Equality, the National Secretariat of Youth and the General Secretariat of the Presidency.
     
  10. Poitier

    Poitier My Words Law Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    Rio de Janeiro – The march against black genocide started at Manguinhos in the city’s north zone

    Rapper and geography student, Tiago Onidaru said he sees up close the consequences of violence. “We lost several brothers in the community. If not a friend of ours, it’s a friend of a friend,” said the 27-year old, who also complained about black representation in the media. “It’s a lack of representation, and when there are (blacks) it is to make them look ridiculous,” said the rapper.

    In demonstration in Brasília, the stories of violence and prejudice were many. The nursing technician Lourdes Pereira, 49, had her nephew Flávio Rogério, 20, killed by police in Teresina. “My nephew died because of a pre-judgment of the police. This judgment is disguised racism,” she said. She is a resident of Cidade Ocidental, a municipality in the state of Goiás near Brasília. A black woman, Lourdes said that “she feels the difference up close. When we seek employment, for example, and we are not chosen and the difference is not in the resume.” (See here, here or here, for example)

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    Bahia – The march proceeded on major streets in the capital city, Salvador, the city known as “Black Rome”

    The rapper Divino Monteiro, aka Dino Black, expresses feelings in verse. “My brothers only mark their presence if they were there to wash the bathrooms or the floor. It hurts me to think of so much exploitation. There are black suckers thinking that slaveryended. You can believe that it hasn’t,” he says the song “Onde Estamos” (Where We Are). “When the black comes in, he’s the first suspect. That happens to me: it’s enough when I get on a bus for everyone to look at me, it’s enough to go into a store that they think I’m going to steal something,” says the rapper, who is resident of Candangolândia, an administrative region of the Federal District.

    Manaus

    In Manaus, the march took place in the Cidade Nova neighborhood, in the north zone, and with the participation of nine institutions that fight for the rights of blacks, as well as groups of Hip-hop, capoeira, graffiti and other artistic manifestations. Despite the small number of protesters (about 500 according to evaluations), the organizers believe it’s an advance in the Amazonas, a state that has no tradition in the struggle of the movement.

    [​IMG]
    Espírito Santo – People took to the streets of the capital city of Vitória with the slogan ‘Reaja Ou Será Morto (React or be killed)

    According to Luiz Gonzaga Fernando Costa, of the Instituto Ganga Zumba, Amazonas is a state where crimes of racism against blacks occur frequently despite the majority of the population having indigenous origin. “We need to expose these cases of violence and our movement is to aggregate and not segregate,” Costa said.

    One of the slogans of the march was “Reaja, ou seja morto” (React or be killed) and for Rosiete Barros, a member of the Rede de Educação Cidadã (Network of Citizen Education) in many cases violence against blacks comes from those who should protect them. “There is a high incidence of police abuse towards young blacks. But it starts from school because the institutions don’t teach the history of black culture and there is still abarrier against the religions of African origin,” said Rosiete.

    One of the members of the Federação de Umbanda e Cultos Afro-Brasileiros (Federation of Umbanda and Afro-Brazilian Cults) of the state of Amazonas (Fucabeam), Cristiane Floriza, stressed that religious intolerance in regards to African religions comes from many teachers and becomes a motive for crimes against sacerdotes (priests). For her,the prejudice is the result of ignorance, and because of this, this culture should be presented in school, but many teachers are opposed because of their personal beliefs.

    [​IMG]
    Belo Horizonte – In the capital of Minas Gerais, protesters occupied one of the main streets of the city

    “This year alone, three men, Umbanda priests, were murdered in the Amazon. We cannot put on the attire or a cloth on our heads or we’re already branded as Satanists,” said Cristiane.

    In the evaluation of Jéssica Santos, representative of the Fórum da Juventude Negra (Forum of Black Youth) of the Amazonas (Fojune), young blacks from the periferia(periphery or outskirts) of Manaus are the ones who suffer most from police violence. She affirms that there is intimidation in the police precincts themselves, where the Lei7716/1989 (law), which punishes the crime of racism, is ignored.

    Belo Horizonte

    In Belo Horionte, about 200 protesters gathered on Aarão Reis street, next to Praça da Estação (Estação Square), starting at 3pm. Traffic came to a halt near São Paulo street and Avenida Amazonas, in the downtown region of the state capital.

    Carrying signs and shouting slogans, the protesters denounced the fact that even after 126 years of abolition, black Brazilians continue fighting for full citizenship.

    http://blackwomenofbrazil.co/2014/0...hroughout-brazil-where-is-the-media-coverage/
     
  11. Don Drogo

    Don Drogo Superstar

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    dope thread. Interested in learning more about my afro latin brothas and sistas especially :obama:

    A lot of them actually repatriated to nigeria a few decades ago, a rich nigerian family(The fernandez) came from Cuba.
     
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  12. Box Cutta

    Box Cutta Bumbling Sidekick

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    This isn't a current event but I'm assuming this thread is pretty much for black diasporan culture in general? In college I had this literature class that was controlled by the Africana Studies department. Black Professor whose outward appearance and mannerisms would suggest Tom from The Boondocks but who was really all about black excellence and knowledge....:wow:

    We had to read a number of books throughout the semester, but the one that left the biggest impression on me was Chambacu : Black Slums (And being honest, this was the only one I actually kept..had to sell the rest back for the cash.

    [​IMG]

    As the summary suggest, the most interesting aspect of the book is the dichotomy between Maximo...who is a pro-black marxist militant...and his brother Jose...a drub abusing, c00ning ass criminal who married a white bytch....:laugh: Book is actually pretty funny in some parts, especially in light of the subject matter.

    And it's only like, 100 pages. Come to think of it, I'm taking a trip soon and may re-read this on the road.
     
  13. 606onit

    606onit Superstar

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    :salute:

    No Dominicans allowed tho cuz remember, they're 100% NON-BLACK. :lolbron: :russ:
     
  14. blackzeus

    blackzeus Superstar

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    On one hand I don't want mad nikkaz flockin' to some of my hideaway spots. On the other hand I would be truly remiss to not help a brother out who's trying to improve sh*t. I doubt any of the Coli members would invest, but....

    ^^^photos you can find on the internet. Places with a lot of black folk you wouldn't think of:

    - Eastern Costa Rica (Jamaican descendants), Coastal honduras (garifuna), southereastern Mexico, especially in the state of Guerrero. La Paz, Bolivia is also a place has hella native blacks that nobody talks about/mentions

    -Jamaica has a stock exchange as far as I know, but the real money in the Caribbean is in banking IMHO tossing your money into a CD in Latin America is generally a good look, rates of return in Costa Rica for example on some CDs were as high as 25% within a 12 month period :myman: You could make money doing private mortgages because in most of Latin America rates are like around 18%. So meaning that if you did a $10,000 mortgage that's $1,800 in interest a year, if you had 10 properties that's $18,000 a year, even if you work at the mall you can save $5K a year, and in 20 years be set up to retire in a Caribbean country. Simple things related to warm weather like ice distribution and refrigerated trucking is also a good business.

    Jamaica of course the music scene is incredible, as is DR, a lot of companies do good giving local acts Live Nation type deals, meaning they give them a certain guaranteed amount and put them on a nationwide tour. Latinos won't really buy records, but they will show out for concerts :yes: Really in Latin American outside of Mexico I don't really see a booming movie industry, Brazil does its thing here and there, but really I don't think the Caribbean entertainment business is for Coli brehs

    :what: Nikka they are on twitter and facebook just like everybody else. Most definitely though the way to communicate is messaging apps like Whatsapp or Viber

    Food, entertainment, raw materials. I knew some guys out of New York who would fly out to Haiti 2-3x a year to buy art, they were making a KILLING, buying pieces for like $50-1000 and then selling it for 10-20x the original price :wow: I definitely think Haitian art is phenomenal. If Coli brehs wanna do business in the Caribbean you have to go there, otherwise you might as well to sell your sh*t to the Caribbeans here in the US and let them deal with the headache. Cell phones are always easy money, especially if you're flying in. I think if you're into the music scene, finding some raw talent and breaking him into the US circuit is good business, especially for reggae acts. You find a talented guy and put him on the circuit in New York, South Florida, California, etc you could easily make $500 a show

    If anything, the Caribbean, like Africa, is open. Odds are if you are a successful entrepreneur whatever you're doing here in the US could be replicated with in the Caribbean with half the competition. Look at Carlos Slim, Mexico has only had cell phones for about 10 years and the nikka is a billionaire. Good luck coli brehs :myman:
     
  15. ZEupTWN

    ZEupTWN Mid|Range|Game|

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    the obsession with black/afro latino's on this forum is quite hilarious :mjlol::mjlol:
     
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