Brett Favre texts leak again. prison Anticipation thread. Stole 1 million fron Welfare to get a new arena for his daughters college team

beaniemac

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CNN is FINALLY calling out the double standard between black and white athlete scandals:


Brett Favre’s latest scandal revives debate about how Black and White athletes are treated differently​


Analysis by Brandon Tensley, CNN
Published 10:21 AM EDT, Thu September 29, 2022


Brett Favre

Brett Favre
Michael Owens/Getty Images
WashingtonCNN —

The welfare funds scandal involving Brett Favre has left people reeling.
A string of texts appears to show the Pro Football Hall of Famer pressuring former Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican, about funding the construction of a volleyball facility at the University of Southern Mississippi – Favre’s alma mater and where his daughter played the sport at the time – though Favre had been told that misusing state funds was potentially illegal, per new court filings. The funding of the project was part of an investigation into millions of dollars of misspent public welfare funds within the Mississippi Department of Human Services.
It’s unclear how the matter might unfold. But, already, it’s revived discussion about an age-old pattern: In the wake of scandal, White athletes seem to be treated differently from their Black peers.
“People believe there’s just more vitriol directed at Black athletes when they commit wrongdoings or give the appearance of messing up – and I think that’s more than fair. While no one is standing up for Favre, there isn’t this loud cry that he should lose everything,” the journalist Jemele Hill pointed out on Twitter.
“People almost always want a pound of flesh when it comes to Black athletes, and it’s often unrelenting. So sometimes it’s not about coverage, but tone,” she added.

To further explore the issue, I spoke with Harry Edwards, a professor emeritus at UC Berkeley whose research interests include race relations and the sociology of sport. He’s also the author of the 1969 book “The Revolt of the Black Athlete,” about activism among Black athletes.
Our conversation has been lightly edited for length and clarity.
What were your thoughts when you first heard about the scandal involving Brett Favre?
Well, on the one hand, I was familiar with Favre’s history, even while he was playing in the league, so on that level, I didn’t think that something like this was outside the bounds of his capabilities, let’s say.
On the other hand, there’s an awful lot of publicity around this case. He hasn’t been charged with anything at this point, much less convicted of anything. But he’s become the face of this tragic situation.
The people who also should be the face of this situation are the former governor, the people who administer funds and so forth. But, instead, because of his fame, Favre has become the poster boy for ripping off poor people in the poorest state in the country.
Jemele Hill recently noted that Black athletes often face more vitriol following an allegation of wrongdoing. Would you agree that this is a theme?

Absolutely. We can look at this situation as part of the fabric of White privilege in US society. When a White athlete behaves in a detestable way, the incident tends to be sportswashed, which is typical when you’re dealing with athletic celebrity. But it’s also whitewashed. That’s the White privilege element of it.
For example, people talked for decades about Jack Johnson – the first Black American world heavyweight boxing champion – and his philandering and casual relationships with women. (He had several interracial relationships throughout the early 20th century.)
If you compare Johnson with Babe Ruth (the legendary baseball player, who was White and also involved in various affairs), you couldn’t get a credit card between them. But Ruth wasn’t just sportswashed; he was whitewashed. It became a situation of masculinity, prowess, virility. But it became an issue of degeneracy with Johnson. So, this goes back for decades. There’s whitewashing that goes on in combination with sportswashing.
Sportswashing: That’s a term I’m not familiar with. Could you say more about what it means?
Athletic celebrity involves such an investment by masses of people. I mean, what kind of allegiance does it take to walk around in a jersey with someone else’s name on it? That kind of allegiance is very hard to reverse, unless it involves something perceived to be of greater sentiment or political, religious, personal or racial value.
For example, you had people who had worn Colin Kaepernick’s jersey start to burn it when he took a knee in protest of police violence against Black people. Something involving ripping off poor people, especially poor Black people? I don’t think that people are going to burn Favre’s jersey over that.
To me, this appears to be one of those situations where sport prevails over common decency, especially because the athlete was a winner. That’s what people buy into.
What will you be keeping an eye on in the weeks ahead?
It’ll be interesting to see how everything evolves and how long the issue remains a focus of conversation, especially since a lesser-valued group is being victimized and the scandal involves one of the greatest quarterbacks in NFL history. At the end of the day, that’s what I’m looking for. It’ll also be interesting to see how the NFL responds.
 

Originalman

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CNN is FINALLY calling out the double standard between black and white athlete scandals:


Also breh it took folks going ham in social media for the media to even want to talk about this shyt. Like the Udoka incident made folks on social media hot how the coverage was different than the Favre coverage. People started to call the media out all over social media and now the media wants to report on it.

Its similar to the Big Ben situation years ago. Ben had the first allegation and it wasn't really reported. He had the second allegation in Georgia and it was barely reported on with specifically ESPN and ABC doing a total radio silence on the matter for days. Folks on social media started calling out the media double standard and not reporting on the Big Ben rape allegations and then the media outside of Disney owned networks started to report on it cause of the heat they were getting. Then some in the media started to report how Disney owned networks weren't covering it specifically ESPN (Bleacher Report, profootballtalk and Dead Spin called them out directly on articles for the double standard of not reporting on Big Ben's allegations).

You even had old dude here in Dallas Dale Hansen who worked here in Dallas at ESPN 103.3 protest live on air during his show one day because he was directed to not report on Big Ben (he initially reported on it and then management told him don't talk again about the story) and then he quit the next day because of it. Folks were calling out ESPN for not reporting on Big Ben and the double standard that they were finally forced to report on the incident followed by ABC days later.
 
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PHamm

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Also breh it took folks going ham in social media for the media to even want to talk about this shyt. Like the Udoka incident made folks on social media hot how the coverage was different than the Favre coverage. People started to call the media out all over social media and now the media wants to report on it.

Its similar to the Big Ben situation years ago. Ben had the first allegation and it wasn't really reported. He had the second allegation in Georgia and it was barely reported on with specifically ESPN and ABC doing a total radio silence on the matter for days. Folks on social media started calling out the media double standard and not reporting on the Big Ben rape allegations and then the media outside of Disney owned networks started to report on it cause of the heat they were getting. Then some in the media started to report how Disney owned networks weren't covering it specifically ESPN (Bleacher Report, profootballtalk and Dead Spin called them out directly on articles for the double standard of not reporting on Big Ben's allegations).

You even had old dude here in Dallas Dale Hansen who worked here in Dallas at ESPN 103.3 protest live on air during his show one day because he was directed to not report on Big Ben (he initially reported on it and then management told him don't talk again about the story) and then he quit the next day because of it. Folks were calling out ESPN for not reporting on Big Ben and the double standard that they were finally forced to report on the incident followed by ABC days later.
Same thing with Peyton Manning at Tennessee
 

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That Steve McNair shyt was fukked up on all sides

The chick that killed him was fukkin crazy but you know it did look bad how he was basically leading a double life with him being married with children.. That shyt was fukked up

I really felt bad for his wife it just a horrible situation on all sides

Steve's wife treatment of his oldest 2 kids not from her was shady too. And the aftermath of his death exposing the dirty shyt she was doing was even worse.
 

Originalman

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Same thing with Peyton Manning at Tennessee
Yep, I remember when that incident happened with the trainer and the media kept it on the low. Only for Shaun King to get the incident back in the news decades later.
 

Originalman

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Steve's wife treatment of his oldest 2 kids not from her was shady too. And the aftermath of his death exposing the dirty shyt she was doing was even worse.

Yep. Steve wasn't an angel but everyone including his wife knew about the side women. Steve had women when they first got together as well. But when Steve was killed, Mechelle immediately cut his family off financially and changed her number. Messed up part is because Steve was very good with his money. He was frugal and had a lot of land where it was enough for his wife, kids and other family members. But Mechelle due to greed either took the shyt away or let folks lose everything by not continuing to pay for it once Steve died.

Crazy thing is Steve was one of the most down to earth athletes you will ever meet. In the offseason he would come to Hattiesburg or Collins and call up all his old high school friends and take them to the club with him. You would see him in the club and he hugging everyone and smiling. You would see him in the restaurant and he would be signing strangers autographs. Or see him in the liquor store (we all know he like Favre loved to drink) and dude would spend 10 minutes in there just dapping everyone up (nothing but black folks who were strangers). He would spend more time dapping people up than he would buying something. shyt one of my home boys got a older cousin who Steve would go fishing with in his offseasons. Just go to random creek in Mississippi outside of Hattiesburg fishing with regular folks from the country.

He truly was a regular dude who just happened to be rich and famous. But he never carried himself as though he was rich and famous.
 

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Trump alignment doesnt stop.


At this point, Brett might as well start snitching on everybody considering that they’ve done it to him to save themselves. I still don’t think he will be charged considering the fact that too many people were involved in the approval and they’d have to go down with him.
 
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