Software Development and Programming Careers (Official Discussion Thread)

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A little humor from r/ProgrammerHumor

sb0o5yq46vd91.jpg
 

Mike809

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My internship is coming to an end next week, i thought it would have been until the end of August.

I was able to finish my intern project, and now I'm just cleaning up some code and writing up my presentation due on Tuesday.
Right after that , i have a team meeting to discuss the possibility of giving me a full-time offer.

I believe i have a good chance of receiving an offer, the only thing that would stop them from that...would be the current economic situation,
but they did hire a new team manager and a new team member while i been here so who knows.
 

Regular Developer

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On the right column , I can only recognize PHP.
never seen those other languages.
I have no idea what any of those are either, lol


Just more advice for anyone interviewing for python based positions. Make sure you have an answer for the question "How do you approach testing?" Get familiar with Pytest and running pytest in a dockerbuild file. That can help set you apart from the field of candidates.
 

Obreh Winfrey

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I have no idea what any of those are either, lol


Just more advice for anyone interviewing for python based positions. Make sure you have an answer for the question "How do you approach testing?" Get familiar with Pytest and running pytest in a dockerbuild file. That can help set you apart from the field of candidates.
"How? MF I don't :gucci: "
 

Dr. Acula

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Brehs, I have no idea why I never considered programming as a viable career path before. I pushed myself through a law degree to the point where I became depressed and started hating my life.

Six months ago, I saw there was a Udemy sale on a python course. Copped that and a webdev course for like 20 bucks. Always been a good student, but I used to hate studying if that makes sense.. Now for the first time in my life, I actually have to stop myself or I'll sit in front of the laptop until the next morning. Even if I get stuck on a problem (which of course happens to me all the time because I'm a total noob), I don't get frustrated and I find myself searching for solutions for hours, sometimes even days.

I'm just baffled that I never even considered programming until now when I'm in my mid 30s.

I've always loved tinkering with things and figuring out how they work since I was a young boy.

If it wasn't for this forum, the thought probably wouldn't have entered my mind.
It's not that hard of a barrier to break into. People just need to be willing to put the work in. If you enjoy it while doing so, even better because it doesn't feel like work.


Also, as seems to be in your case, a lot of it depends on how the subject is taught and introduced to you. I've had university professors who I know were so bad as teachers they drove people to switch majors. I had a professor for my computer architecture class who was literally the worst teacher I had in my life. He spent the full 1 hour and 20 mins reading verbetim the power point slides to the class. Not even slides he came up with, but the slides you can download from a textbook manufacturer website that are really poor and you can tell they created as an afterthought to tack on as a benefit of buying their materials. I literally shook my head when I heard he was teaching intro to programming courses. I know he had freshmen dropping the major left and right. He also didn't bother to learn anything about what he taught. If you asked him a question, he broke like a robot got water spilled on it because you made him deviate from his monotonous reading of PowerPoint slides.

I'm in my 30s and always wished I could play an instrument but never learned one. A month ago I downloaded an app called simply piano and broke out the keyboard sitting in my closet for a decade and started to learn and since the app makes it so fun, I had the same shyt happen to me where my girl has to literally drag me away from the keyboard to stop learning.

I think people box themselves out of topics and learning new things because either they tell themselves they can't do something or their introduction to a topic was poor.
 
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Obreh Winfrey

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I'm in my 30s and always wished I could play an instrument but a month ago I downloaded an app called simply piano and broke out the keyboard sitting in my closet for a decade and started to learn and since the app makes it so fun, I had the same shyt happen to me where my girl has to literally drag me away from the keyboard to stop learning.
That's the barrier in my opinion. How do we make shyt fun for people to learn. For me, learning C# was fun because I was halfway trying to make games with Unity. But then take DS&A, nothing about that is fun for me and I quickly get frustrated and give up.
 

Duke Wy Lin

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It's not that hard of a barrier to break into. People just need to be willing to put the work in. If you enjoy it while doing so, even better because it doesn't feel like work.


Also, as seems to be in your case, a lot of it depends on how the subject is taught and introduced to you. I've had university professors who I know were so bad as teachers they drove people to switch majors. I had a professor for my computer architecture class who was literally the worst teacher I had in my life. He spent the full 1 hour and 20 mins reading verbetim the power point slides to the class. Not even slides he came up with, but the slides you can download from a textbook manufacturer website that are really poor and you can tell they created as an afterthought to tack on as a benefit of buying their materials. I literally shook my head when I heard he was teaching intro to programming courses. I know he had freshmen dropping the major left and right. He also didn't bother to learn anything about what he taught. If you asked him a question, he broke like a robot got water spilled on it because you made him deviate from his monotonous reading of PowerPoint slides.

I'm in my 30s and always wished I could play an instrument but never learned one. A month ago I downloaded an app called simply piano and broke out the keyboard sitting in my closet for a decade and started to learn and since the app makes it so fun, I had the same shyt happen to me where my girl has to literally drag me away from the keyboard to stop learning.

I think people box themselves out of topics and learning new things because either they tell themselves they can't do something or their introduction to a topic was poor.

This is spot on. I wanted to become a civil engineer back in highschool. But then during career orientation the guy who introduced it made it sound so dry and lifeless that I couldn't see myself doing it for the rest of my life. He did a good job turning a bunch of us away from ever pursuing that path.

Was it shallow on my part and should I have spoken to more ppl before I made my final decision, arguably. But once that first impression is placed inside a young mind it's hard to shake off.
 
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