52 Hand Blocks - let's talk about it

Mowgli

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I would hope not I was listing examples of shyt that wouldn't work w gloves on
No gloves just using a lnife in jab hand to poke like a jab.

Cats from probably every style would deflate
 

Inf1ne

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Any boxer that uses a 4 inch blade in his jab hand?

:francis:
You a jujitsu guy right? Everybody know y'all got the submission game on lock but what happens when you choke somebody to sleep and end up getting stomped by a cheap shot?? Every style got its flaws and no martial art looks as smooth in a real fight as it does in a demo
 

Inf1ne

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Depends I know a lot of the shyt that look like little slaps is meant to be done with a razor between your fingers
No gloves just using a lnife in jab hand to poke like a jab.

Cats from probably every style would deflate
 

Mowgli

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Depends I know a lot of the shyt that look like little slaps is meant to be done with a razor between your fingers
It dont matter if you block if someone has a stiff in and out jab and poking ur forearms with a blade.

Dancing circles around u poking the face onnthe rush. Its a lebel of brutality id never want to see.

Like close quarters fencing
 

Waterproof

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The True 52 Blocks is one of the only African American Diaspora Self Defense/Martial Art and it's great striking fighting art.

It's a defensive inside fighting striking art that attacks vulnerable body parts and tissues, nervous systems, it uses the elbows not only to block but also striking and attack from different angles

It's a very secretive fighting art in the black community my Uncles learned some in prison and came out and taught us some moves in the 80's


Many 52 Blocks proponents argue that the true inspiration for the form does not come from Asia, but from Africa. 52 Blocks scholar Daniel Marks, who first learned of the form from street savvy recruits while in the Army, refers in a brief monograph to the southern African American fighting style of “Knocking and Kicking.” Frazier similarly connects Jail House Rock back to a “Virginia Scufflin” boxing style practiced by slaves in the 1800s. The existence of enslaved bare knuckle boxers—like the famous Tom Molineaux—who were forced to fight for their masters’ entertainment, is documented in other sources, including the foundational early-1800s prize fighting account, Boxiana. Marks and Frazier both connect Southern African American fighting styles back to African martial arts, such as Hausa Boxing (also known as Dambe) in Nigeria.

 

Waterproof

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52 Blocks has been called the Capoeira of North America. It is a fighting style that uses the upper body (mainly forearms and elbows) to block strikes, mainly punches. There are various modern demonstrators of 52 Blocks, some displaying more practical applications, and some more fanciful versions that would have little application to a real fight. The more practical versions resemble what is commonly referred to as dirty boxing, but in reality, it is part boxing and part martial art.


As the name implies, 52 Blocks has been described as a defense based countering fighting style. That’s a little misleading though because as it’s taught and displayed today, I would say its 50/50 defense / offense in application. The blocks themselves are intended not only to defend but to inflict injury at the same time. To any of you who had ever punched an elbow, you’ll appreciate the gravity of a fist landing on hard bone.

This often results in fractures to the metacarpels. This can also occur to punches landing on the head, which is why palm strikes are the preferred method of striking to the head in hand to hand combat. Slaps are used in 52 Blocks street fighting moves. Its an ever advancing method involving dynamic torso twisting, tight footwork, shifting stances, and a natural flowing pressure-fighting feel. Some of the “blocks” or moves are:

  • Skull and Crossbones
  • Close Door Open Door
  • Triangle Train
  • Black Man Rising
  • Kiss and Catch
  • Scoop against shank
  • “g-lock”
  • The pants leg flip
  • Shaolin blocks
  • Secret g=mc lock
  • Defense against an uppercut
  • Circle hands trap
  • Hook and take down.
  • Open gates (buttefly) and take down.
  • Choke out
  • The shank
  • Gun disarming
  • Slap hands etc.
Prominent New York trainer, Lyte Burly maintains that 52 Blocks “is 90% elbows”. Unlike the stiffer approach though used in Muay Thai, 52 requires fluidity of the shoulder joints and rotator cuffs. This is achieved by daily mobility exercises that increase and maintain that suppleness of the joints.

Footwork and body Movements

Although developed in close quarters situations, such as crowded and cramped cells, it does have footwork and evasive moves of the head. It is common to hone reflexes and condition the defensive movements through highly repetitious fear drills and dodging moves.

Elbow and Forearm Blocks

These techniques really highlight 52’s defense emphasis. The one pictured above is a counter to a jab / straight right combo. The jab is caught and then the elbow presented to spoil the incoming straight right

Punches and Arm Movements

When you see a display of 52 Blocks, there sometimes appears to be an unnecessary amount of arm motion. These movements are not always employed in actual fights, but are often just drills that aid the student in becoming at ease with his body’s natural movement patterns.


It is not a “hard” fighting method, despite the ferocity of its blocks. There is no “kata” employed as such, as in traditional karate, but an improvisational form of blocking patterns is used as a form of shadow boxing.

Haymaker punch (more often called theOverhand Right in MMA) is often used in 52. Why? Consider a situation where a man is waving a knife in your face. Your back’s up against a wall. At some point though, you get the chance to throw something at him. You want to go over his hands, rather than take a path that could land your knuckles on his blade.
 

Waterproof

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Catching Punches

52 employs a lot of techniques that involve a sort of hybrid of blocks and holds. These are designed to simultaneously defend, immobilize, and set up counter attacks. They are useful in real life self defense, and in mixed martial arts competition.

Practitioners sometimes refer to these techniques as catching punches. There are several techniques but the most famous is the “kiss and catch” which made Mother Dear famous. The move involves catching a haymaker or wild overhand throw. The opponents arm is then locked and a counter to either the head or body is dealt as the locked arm is maneuvered to open the opponent up. It can be used against jabs too, but requires speed and accuracy. Its a dangerous one for the novice as the back is exposed to a degree.

At its core, 52 is an up close infightingsystem. Among coaches, the analogy of the ‘phone booth’ is used. This is to make students aware of the space they need to focus on in order to judge their opponents angles and movements. To this end, sparing often takes place in corners, stair wells, and roped off areas of not more than a few square feet.

Although the style is often slated as dirty boxing, it isn’t if looked at from an MMA perspective. Most trainers deny its dirty boxing but instead an effective form of self defence.
 

2 Up 2 Down

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Haven't looked but wasn't this created by some dude in Rikers named Mother something and the only way he would teach it to someone else is if you did something sexual with him?
 
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