Covid will be a leading cause of death in the U.S. indefinitely, whether or not the pandemic is 'over'

CrimsonTider

Seduce & Scheme
WOAT
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
73,309
Reputation
-13,770
Daps
115,942
My cousin is a medical coder and we were talking recently. She said since the pandemic began she hasn’t coded ONE case of the flu and barely ever any common colds. Not saying COVID isn’t real, because it is, but the stats are VERY far off…
This story is totally believable

By any chance, could you set up an AMA with your cousin and TLR?
 
Joined
Feb 7, 2015
Messages
10,048
Reputation
1,294
Daps
37,904
It sounds good but where is the data and why haven’t any health organization come out and said this when people have already been questioning what happened to the flu?

It’s incredible how lazy some of y’all are

The news talked about that ALOT





Like damn all I searched for is “what happened to the flu” and that and a bunch of other shyt popped up. The lack of intellectual curiosity is maddening and disappointing
 

Amestafuu (Emeritus)

Veteran
Supporter
Joined
May 8, 2012
Messages
59,602
Reputation
11,662
Daps
253,211
Reppin
Toronto
My cousin is a medical coder and we were talking recently. She said since the pandemic began she hasn’t coded ONE case of the flu and barely ever any common colds. Not saying COVID isn’t real, because it is, but the stats are VERY far off…
Lies lies and bullshyt. Man we're almost 3 years in

Who's still even having this debate? You can't be serious.
 

B86

Superstar
Joined
May 1, 2012
Messages
11,638
Reputation
1,479
Daps
36,440
Reppin
Da Burgh
Lies lies and bullshyt. Man we're almost 3 years in

Who's still even having this debate? You can't be serious.
Because I’m gonna just come on here and make shyt up. Is it a lie that I’m unvaxxed and haven’t had COVID once? It’s 3 years later and some of us are so damn dumb that we STILL can’t see the world got played?
 

bnew

Veteran
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Messages
23,927
Reputation
4,703
Daps
90,945
Was reported today covid could result in long term brain damage

this too


SEPTEMBER 20, 2022

Lasting Lung Damage Seen in Children and Teens after COVID


Free-breathing phase-resolved functional lung (PREFUL) low-field MRI at 0.55T with calculated parameters at an axial plane after automatic registration to a mid-expiration position and lung parenchyma segmentation. From left to right, representative color-coded images of functional show ventilation defects (VDP, blue), perfusion defects (QDP, red), ventilation/perfusion (V/Q match, green), ventilation/perfusion defects (V/Q defect, purple) in a healthy control (upper row, 7-year-old male), a participant rec


September 20, 2022 — Children and adolescents who have either recovered from COVID-19 or have long COVID show persistent lung damage on MRI, according to a study published in Radiology, a journal of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Since emerging in late 2019, it has killed more than 5 million people worldwide. The lungs are the primary target for the virus.

Study of the disease’s long-term effects has accelerated as the number of COVID survivors climbs and more people are diagnosed with long COVID. The World Health Organization defines long COVID as involving symptoms that persist for a minimum of 12 weeks and other factors, such as symptoms that result in a new health limitation or worsening of a pre-existing underlying medical condition.

The nature of the post-acute phase of the infection is poorly understood in younger people. CT has shown persistent damage to the lungs in adults, but CT uses ionizing radiation and has limited diagnostic value in children, where lung changes due to COVID-19 are less pronounced.

“We conceived this study when the evidence for long- or post-COVID cases in adults was growing,” said study senior author Ferdinand Knieling, M.D., specialist in pediatrics and adolescent medicine from the departments of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine at University Hospital Erlangen in Erlangen, Germany. “This was also when the first patients with unspecific symptoms were seen in our department, and parents started to ask about an association with a prior infection.”

Dr. Knieling and colleagues studied COVID-19’s effects in children and adolescents using low-field MRI. The technology relies on a lower magnetic field than conventional MRI and allows for free breathing, meaning the subjects do not have to hold their breath during imaging. This makes scanning more feasible in children.

“As parents, we also wanted to find what risks an infection might have,” Dr. Knieling said. “Luckily, our departments teamed up to use their brand-new MRI scanner designed for investigations in children and adolescents.”

The researchers looked at changes in lung structure and function in 54 children and adolescents (mean age 11 years) with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. Of the 54 patients, 29 had recovered, and 25 had long COVID. All but one of the patients had been unvaccinated at the time of original infection.

None of the COVID-19 group required hospital admission during the primary infection period. Shortness of breath, impaired attention, headache, fatigue and loss of smell were the most commonly reported symptoms at the time of the study. Results from the COVID-19 group were compared with those from nine healthy controls.

MRI allowed the researchers to derive the V/Q match, a measure of air and blood flow in the lungs. If lungs are working properly, the air and blood flow should match.

V/Q matches showed persistent pulmonary dysfunction in the patients who had recovered from COVID-19 and in those with long COVID. The V/Q match was 62% in the recovered group and 60% in the long COVID group—both considerably lower than the 81% match in healthy controls.

“Persistent symptoms after COVID still cause diagnostic odysseys, and this is especially true for young people,” Dr. Knieling said. “Our findings illustrate that caring for these patients is a multidisciplinary challenge.”

Long-term implications of these lung changes remain unclear, but the results warrant further surveillance of persistent lung damage in children and adolescents after COVID-19, Dr. Knieling said. Lung MRI is already widely available, he noted, making these imaging approaches easy to integrate into clinical routine care. More research will help show the full potential of MRI in COVID-19 survivors.

“A follow-up trial has already started, and we seek to understand how findings change over time,” Dr. Knieling said. “Additionally, we will take closer looks at other organs to see how this correlates with our findings.”

For more information: www.rsna.org
 
Top