Do White South Africans Deserve To Be Kicked Off Their Farm Land?

T'krm

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BA DOS Af pr
The settlers should be resettled in the ocean, with the sharks.
Great whites:myman:
It ain't "theirs" and being kicked off the land is the least that should happen to those devils.
What should happen to them? What if they can prove the land was fairly rece'vd post-apartheid?
I'm not watching a video with a black male in front of a thin blue line flag
:francis:
Listen to sheriff Clarke wannabes brehs
Many commentators....
:dahell: Yeah....and. Their homeland should be none of the white people's concern.... PERIOD... Malema will not repeat the same mistakes as zimbabwe
Which mistakes are you referring to?
 

DaRealness

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What should happen to them? What if they can prove the land was fairly rece'vd post-apartheid?

You're in the states, right? Remember what happened in Tulsa?

This is war. I'm done with black folks "rising above it" while everyone else gets to do what they want. We need to stop caring about "fair" (no one else does) and focus on victory and liberation instead.
 

Yehuda

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Yes, but the land has to be put into good use.

That's what worries me the most. Nobody is talking about what they are going to do with the land.

[ . . .] After a 10-year legal battle, the Moletele have taken back the land from which they were evicted by members of the white minority nearly a century ago.

The area, a picturesque range at the foot of mountains near Hoedspruit in the country's northeast, is dotted with trees heavy with fruit.

"To us, we see it as our dignity has been restored," said Hezekiel Nkosi, the chairman of the Moletele Communal Property Association which pressed the claim.

"We are making sure that our people work on the farm and make it successful." [ . . . ]

Often, land transfers end in failure with new owners walking away from their investments after struggling to turn a profit.

The Moletele community itself came close to disaster after 1,615 families took over the area of 70,000 hectares (173,000 acres) that was found to be theirs in 2007. [ . . . ]

But because of a lack of cash, training and limited market access, the hopes of the Moletele quickly turned to despair.

"Farming was very difficult because we have to pay for inputs such as fertilisers or electricity. All costs -- but we didn't have money," recalls Nkosi.

"So we advertised for people who could assist in running the farm." [ . . . ]

And in a striking breakthrough for race relations in the country, their call was answered by white farmers.

The Moletele agreed to pay a percentage of the land's revenues over 20 years to the established local farmer in return for expertise.

Following the deal, the former landowners became the workers while the one-time labourers became the bosses.

And against the odds, the arrangement was a success.

"When we took over the farm, there was really nothing going on there, it was totally neglected," said farmer Duo Landman.

"What we did is we took our practices from our own farms and just implemented them. Now it's definitely profitable."

The Moleteles' venture has since benefited from their partners' know-how, their processing facilities and their extensive distribution networks.

Their lemons and mangoes are sold at home and abroad and helped the black-led enterprise to report its first profits.

"Here we have an example of successful land reform," said Pieter Scholtz, chief executive of the operation, Matuma Farms.

"Seventy percent of the land belongs to the people of the Moletele community," he added. [ . . . ]

'Our dignity has been restored': farmers prove land reform can work

I posted this story before in the stickied thread, what is your take on it?
 

Tom Foolery

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T'krm

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The false data supporting land expropriation


With reference to your editorial “ Why South Africa needs land reform legislation” (August 27): the issue needs rational debate, founded on facts — a standard to which not only Donald Trump must be held. Consider the widely-cited distortion of data on South African landholding. Contrary to your editorial, an official audit did not find that “72 per cent of farms and agricultural holdings in SA are owned by whites and 24 per cent by non-whites”, nor that only 4 per cent of the latter are black Africans. The “audit” revealed that assigning a racial identity to ownership was impossible for over two-thirds of rural land (note, too, the information refers to acreage, not farm units, as you imply). This is because most is owned by the state, and by companies, trusts and community property associations. The figures you cite refer only to land held by private individuals, registered at the deeds office (about 31 per cent of the country). These figures reflect past and current practices. Under colonial and apartheid rule, freehold title was typically denied to Africans. Land they did have access to was held “in trust”, by the state or by traditional leaders. This has continued since 1994. Thus, most of the landholdings to which Africans have “access” — and most land transferred to them via reform initiatives (around 6 per cent of the country’s area) — are not reflected, racially, in the audit. Such false data support a narrative that land reform has failed to such an extent that only deeply intrusive state power over property rights can succeed — hence the demand for expropriation without compensation. In this lies a great danger. Would it be limited to “unused land, derelict buildings, purely speculative land holdings, or circumstances where occupiers have strong historical rights and title holders do not occupy or use their land”? Possibly. But as yet, the only certainty seems to be that the ruling party is intent on implementing this policy. No firm plans have been advanced, and only vague, non-binding assurances. It is being vigorously promoted by many political leaders and shows every sign of developing a momentum that will be difficult to contain. Indeed, despite President Cyril Ramaphosa’s call for debate, he recently announced his party’s intention to amend the bill of rights to make the state’s right to take property without compensation “more explicit”. And this before mandatory public hearings had been completed. The implications are not encouraging.
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DEAD7

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Taking the land wasn't the way to go in my opinion. Its highly unlikely the state will be able to produce the returns the cac farmers were seeing for some time.
I would have liked them to target the cacs profits.
 

Secure Da Bag

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Taking the land wasn't the way to go in my opinion. Its highly unlikely the state will be able to produce the returns the cac farmers were seeing for some time.
I would have liked them to target the cacs profits.

Land inequality leads to income inequality, so they might as well take the land. Also, there should a skills program in place anyway to replace those farmers already put in place.
 

DEAD7

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Land inequality leads to income inequality, so they might as well take the land. Also, there should a skills program in place anyway to replace those farmers already put in place.
I doubt this is the case, and sadly I doubt inequality will be reduced by this...a cac tax used to subsidize native blacks would likely have done more short term... while giving the cacs both incentive and time to leave on their own. Win-win.
 
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