Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders Task Forces Publish Proposals

FAH1223

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110 page document :whew: :smugbiden:
full






WASHINGTON — A coalition of Democrats has presented Joe Biden with a roadmap for an ambitious, progressive agenda in the White House that would include proposals to immediately address ongoing crises, reflecting areas of consensus reached after weeks of deliberations between allies of the presumptive nominee and Bernie Sanders.

The former primary rivals, whose sharp differences were on display throughout the year-long Democratic nomination battle, will jointly release the specific policy recommendations made by the so-called Unity Task Forces they appointed in April to find common ground on six key areas: climate change, criminal justice reform, the economy, education, health care and immigration.

The recommendations include draft language that will be submitted to the Democratic National Committee’s party committee as a “starting point” for their consideration, the Biden campaign said, adding that the former vice president “looks forward to reviewing” their work.

A review of the 110-page document provided to NBC News in advance of its public release offers fresh evidence of how the Biden campaign, having held firmly to the center in a Democratic primary that began with a record field of candidates racing to the left, is open to some — but not all — of the progressive wing’s approaches as he prepares for the general election campaign.
The health care task force, for instance, focused on ways to expand coverage through Biden’s firmly held position of building on the Affordable Care Act, rather than pursuing a single-payer system like Medicare for All. But the climate task force, co-chaired by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., recommended more aggressive timelines for achieving net-zero carbon emissions than Biden had called for in the campaign.

Both sides highlighted the final work product as reflecting unprecedented — and to many unexpected — party unity. The idea of the task force was an outgrowth of discussions between the campaigns as Biden began to build an insurmountable delegate advantage, motivated by the shared goal of defeating President Donald Trump and the recognition that the party needed to be fully united to do so.

Each camp saw mutual benefit in the arrangement: for Biden, smoothing a process to win over the Vermont senator’s most ardent supporters and avoid the intraparty tension that plagued Hillary Clinton’s 2016 candidacy; and for Sanders, a guaranteed seat at the table on policy and personnel that would ensure that his “movement” lasted beyond his candidacy.

But as the six eight-person teams set about their work, the unfolding health and economic crises caused by the coronavirus and the renewed national debate over race gave their work new urgency that helped focus their efforts.

The final product reflects the growing recognition across the party that a Biden administration will have a unique opportunity, and in their view necessity, to take far more aggressive actions on multiple fronts than many were considering at the start of the campaign.

Even Biden, who campaigned throughout the primaries as a pragmatic Democrat and argued that Americans were more interested in “results” than a “revolution,” has increasingly spoken of a New Deal-style agenda to start his administration, nodding to the robust federal response to the Great Depression promised by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

In May, when most of the U.S. was still in a lockdown due to the pandemic, Biden declared on his podcast “Here’s the Deal” that the moment had led the country to “need some revolutionary institutional changes.”

“For the millions of Americans facing hardship due to President Trump’s failed coronavirus response, this election offers the chance to usher in a stronger, fairer economy that works for our working families,” Biden said in a statement welcoming the task forces’ recommendations.

“I commend the task forces for their service and helping build a bold, transformative platform for our party and for our country. And I am deeply grateful to Senator Sanders for working together to unite our party, and deliver real, lasting change for generations to come," Biden said.

Sanders said that while he, Biden and their supporters “have strong disagreements” about some policy issues, “we also understand that we must come together in order to defeat Donald Trump, the most dangerous president in modern American history.”

“Though the end result is not what I or my supporters would have written alone, the task forces have created a good policy blueprint that will move this country in a much-needed progressive direction and substantially improve the lives of working families throughout our country. I look forward to working with Vice President Biden to help him win this campaign and to move this country forward toward economic, racial, social and environmental justice,” he said.

The Trump campaign, having found little success so far in defining Biden as out of the mainstream, is likely to pounce on the policy moves as evidence that the veteran, familiar Democrat is something of a Trojan horse for the extreme left.

Policies Republicans characterize as radical reform — including the Green New Deal, Medicare for All, defunding the police and abolishing the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) — are notably not mentioned as recommendations.

But former Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir, who has been a key part of the unity efforts, argued that doing so “asks you to ignore the reality of what happened” in the primary, when Biden and Sanders’ philosophical differences were regularly on display.

“Even in the steps that he’s making toward our direction, they seem consistent with the Joe Biden who is evolving with the times,” Shakir said. “The country is in a place of economic and health desperation … and the times are really compelling that movement.”

Top officials in both camps insisted that the “odd couple” pairings on panels — former Secretary of State John Kerry leading the climate panel along with Ocasio-Cortez, for starters — were not just for optics. The five Biden and three Sanders representatives on each task force were full participants in weekly Zoom meetings and conference calls that in most cases lasted no less than an hour, and in many cases longer than that. Each panel’s co-chair worked with Sanders adviser Analilia Mejia and Biden adviser Carmel Martin to shape the discussions and move both sides toward consensus.

Aides say the task force’s work could be a model for how the party could govern next January, building goodwill across the ideological spectrum of the party that will be key if Democrats are in position to govern with the White House and majorities in one, or both houses of Congress.

The recommendations, though, include a significant number of actions Biden could direct the executive branch to take without congressional approval, much as the Trump administration has systematically reversed Obama-era actions over his four years. They include executive orders on issues that are currently on the forefront of people’s minds, like helping front-line workers, new guidelines on policing use-of-force measures, housing, outsourcing jobs, addressing health care disparities and undoing Trump’s executive orders on immigration.

Biden on Wednesday, speaking to union supporters, emphasized the “extraordinary chance” Democrats have to enact meaningful changes if elected — and acknowledged the work needed to ensure that he is.

“Not only are we going to win. We're going to take a monumental step forward for the prosperity, power, safety and dignity of all American workers," Biden said. "I truly, truly believe that."
 

brick james

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Its going to be interesting seeing how Biden will govern. And the resistance if he tries to "work with Republicans" on stupid shyt.



Thread from Sunrise movement head



Trump campaign is desperate



:pachaha: I gotta know how the fukk these geriatric fukks who are still trying to use scare tactics about communists from the 50s are still alive? They have to have slaves trapped in their basements for constant blood transfusions right?
 

FAH1223

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Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders Deepen Their Cooperation
Allies of the onetime presidential rivals revealed expansive joint policy recommendations, in a sign of tentative collaboration between the Democratic Party’s wings.

merlin_169580766_a2dd56b2-8a56-4d9d-bc39-03a115ae4eb5-articleLarge.jpg

Senator Bernie Sanders and Joseph R. Biden Jr. at the debate in Charleston, S.C., in February. Mr. Biden announced six policy task forces in May as he tried to bridge Democratic divisions. Credit...Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Allies of Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders unveiled a sweeping set of joint policy recommendations on Wednesday, a significant if tentative sign of cooperation among Democrats as Mr. Biden’s campaign continues its appeals to the progressive left.

Mr. Biden is expected to adopt the recommendations, which were submitted by six policy task forces and cover a wide range of issues including health care, criminal justice, education and climate change.

And while supporters of Mr. Sanders’s agenda were largely successful in moving the proposed platform leftward on key progressive items, the policy recommendations will most likely frustrate some in the party’s activist wing who believe they do not go far enough. The task forces did not recommend plans that Mr. Sanders championed like “Medicare for all,” tuition-free public college for everyone or canceling all student debt.

The task forces also gave their recommendations to the Democratic National Committee’s platform committee.

As the economic and public health impact of the coronavirus pandemic became clear, some consensus between the two factions of the party had already begun to form. But the crisis also enabled the Sanders-aligned members of the task forces to effectively make the case for bolder measures that might otherwise have been rebuffed, particularly on health care, several people said.

Among the recommendations put forth by the health care task force were guaranteed access to free or low-cost high-quality health care plans with a no-deductible option for the duration of the pandemic, and automatic prospective enrollment in a public health insurance plan for Americans already enrolled in social safety net programs.

Other recommendations included a proposal from the economy task force for an executive order to prohibit government contracts with companies that pay less than a $15 minimum wage or that do not remain neutral in unionization efforts; a goal from the climate change task force to eliminate carbon emissions from power plants by 2035; and the creation of an environmental justice fund that will invest in federal agencies to eliminate the disproportionate burden of pollution and environmental hazards that communities of color bear.

In a statement, Mr. Biden commended the task forces’ work and expressed gratitude toward Mr. Sanders “for working together to unite our party, and deliver real, lasting change for generations to come.”

Mr. Sanders, for his part, acknowledged the progress his supporters had made — but also nodded to some lasting disappointment.

“Though the end result is not what I or my supporters would have written alone, the task forces have created a good policy blueprint that will move this country in a much-needed progressive direction and substantially improve the lives of working families throughout our country,” he said.

The extensive recommendations concluded nearly two months of sometimes tense deliberations by the task forces, which Mr. Biden formed as part of his effort to bridge the division among the Democratic establishment and progressives who are unenthusiastic about his candidacy and his longtime message of incremental change.

The task forces included core Biden supporters including former Secretary of State John Kerry and Eric H. Holder Jr., the attorney general under President Barack Obama, as well as top Sanders allies like Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.

Mr. Kerry and Ms. Ocasio-Cortez were co-chairs of the climate change task force, which was hailed from the outset as an important development that signified in part the Biden campaign’s commitment to winning over younger and more liberal voters.

The formation of joint policy working groups had been a crucial compromise from the Biden campaign that helped ease the way for Mr. Sanders to withdraw from the presidential race in early April. But when Mr. Biden announced the task forces in mid-May — on health care, immigration, criminal justice reform, education, climate change and the economy — it was unclear whether they would produce policy results or simply the more symbolic appearance of political harmony.

To facilitate Mr. Biden’s approval of the recommendations, the co-chairs of the committees worked with the campaign to seek agreement on the language, several people involved with the task forces said.

“The campaign accepted these recommendations, which I think is a huge achievement,” said Representative Pramila Jayapal of Washington, a co-chair of the health care task force.

She added, “Most of the people on the task force were probably even to the left of where we ended up because the Biden campaign had to essentially approve everything as we went along and agree to everything as we went along.”


And though the set of recommendations from her task force “doesn’t go as far as we all wanted on the Sanders side,” Ms. Jayapal said, she still viewed it as “a real step forward.”

Committee meetings, which were conducted remotely by Zoom and at times stretched to three or four hours, were generally respectful and civil even when they grew contentious, several people said. The fact that there were very few leaks about the conversations to the news media made members feel they were able to be more candid with their disagreements.

Some of the proposals included in the set of recommendations have already been adopted by Mr. Biden, including lowering the eligibility age for Medicare to 60 and making public college tuition free for families making less than $125,000 a year.

But even as there was a sense among some Sanders-aligned members of the task forces that they had made valuable inroads, the ultimate proposals reflected a compromise that hewed toward what the Biden campaign would find palatable.

Mr. Biden’s supporters, for instance, did not fully embrace a plan to eliminate all student debt — a key pillar of Mr. Sanders’s agenda — resulting in a series of compromises including canceling $50,000 of debt for educators and $10,000 for all borrowers during the pandemic.

Members of the criminal justice reform task force also butted heads over the legalization of marijuana, a policy Mr. Biden does not support.

Ideological fissures were particularly fierce on the economic task force, according to several people, with Biden representatives remaining skeptical of the kinds of universal economic programs espoused by former President Franklin D. Roosevelt and backed by the Sanders-aligned members.

“There were all kinds of frustrations here,” said Sara Nelson, the president of the Association of Flight Attendants union and a co-chair of the economy task force, adding: “If somebody were to say, ‘Well, are you pleased with the outcome?’ That’s all relative.”


But she also said it was important to consider the relatively unprecedented nature of the joint task forces and what they actually did achieve.

“The people who supported Bernie Sanders — this absolutely gives us a step forward,” she said. “We improved Biden’s policies, and you can always be stronger in the fight when you’re fighting from higher ground.”

Even if some progressives remain unhappy with Mr. Biden, there are signs that some who opposed him in the primary are increasingly willing to actively support him in the general election against President Trump.

On Wednesday, Ady Barkan, a prominent liberal activist and advocate for Medicare for all who supported Senator Elizabeth Warren and then Mr. Sanders in the primary, endorsed Mr. Biden, saying, “Even though he wasn’t our first choice, I don’t think that progressives and democratic socialists should sit out the election, or vote third party, and I wanted to make that clear.”
 

FAH1223

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lol at him still balking on marijuana legalization :snoop: thats not a good sign for him "adapting to the times"

we'll see

"Listen here Jack, I know a lot of weed smokers"

Still thinks its a gateway drug. Modest decriminalization plan :snoop:
 

the cac mamba

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lol at him still balking on marijuana legalization :snoop: thats not a good sign for him "adapting to the times"

we'll see
agreed, but honestly who gives a fukk :dead: we'll take care of weed in 2024

and who knows what the dems can write. biden just has to sign the shyt :yeshrug:
 

NkrumahWasRight Is Wrong

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agreed, but honestly who gives a fukk :dead: we'll take care of weed in 2024

and who knows what the dems can write. biden just has to sign the shyt :yeshrug:

youre all about winning

if you want to squeeze every drop out of independents and young voters you come out in favor of legalization and/or decriminalization. period
 
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