Something needs to be done about "Antebellum" homes

Discussion in 'The Root' started by Citi Trends, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Citi Trends

    Citi Trends aka milobased

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    The fact that people can tell ADOS to get over reparations and the past while this is going on has always disgusted me.

    White people owning and passing down "antebellum/pre-civil war" homes aka plantations or homes funded from slave labor. And not only that, profiting even more through touring and selling their likeness.

    All of the homes Im about to post are from one small majority black town(Columbus, Mississippi).
    A town that became a hospital and arms manufacturing site during the civil war(Im sure you can guess which side). A lot of these homes opened themselves up to protect confederate soldiers or were the homes of high ranking Confederate soldiers themselves. So they're also honoring traitors to the country.

    These aren't all of the homes there, just a few prominent ones , there are dozens more.
    1940 Inaugural Columbus Pilgrimage – Star Homes
    MSGenWeb

    Sidenote, if you're not aware, "planter"=plantation owner. Alot of the original owners seem to also be attorney from South Carolina. Going by the time period and the fact that the city was fairly new yet full of plantations, I can assume what they were needed for.



    Rosewood Manor & Gardens(Sykes-Leigh House) (c. 1835)

    TYPES:
    This beautiful Greek Revival antebellum mansion has been featured in Marvelous Old Mansions, Historic Houses, and Colonial Homes. Period furnishings, hand chosen by Mrs. Hicks, are displayed throughout the home. Many objects are museum quality. Enjoy an authentic old plantation chapel and lovely gardens.

    Mr. and Mrs. Dewitt Hicks / National Register

    Rosewood Manor was built in 1838 for Richard Sykes, a local planter. His son, Captain E. T. Sykes, who was born in the house, was a prominent attorney and legislator. In 1847, the property was sold to John M. Moody of Northampton County, Virginia (Lowndes Co., Miss., Deed Book 22, Page 625). He is listed in the 1850 Census as 37 years old and owning 1,110 acres of farm land. Moody sold the house and grounds in 1860 to Mary Jane Crump Leigh, wife of Frank Mecanthlon Leigh to whom title was conveyed in 1874 (Lowndes Co., Miss., Deed Book 32, Page 618). The Leigh family bought the property now known as Leighcrest and located diagonally to the Northeast in 1876. The Leighs sold Rosewood Manor in 1895 to M. W. O'Neill (Lowndes Co., Miss., Deed Book 72, Page 610). The property has changed ownership frequently since 1895, being purchased by the present owners in 1978.
    [​IMG]
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    Stephen D. Lee Home & Museum (c. 1847)
    TYPES:
    Once the home of CSA Gen. Stephen D. Lee, the home was restored in 1960 by the Historical Society and the Society for Preservation of Antiques. It is now houses the Florence McLeod Hazard Museum exhibiting Civil War collections and artifacts.

    After the deaths of Major Blewett and his wife Regina DeGraffenreid, their daughter, Regina Blewett Harrison inherited the house. At her death the house was left to her two daughters, Mary Harrison, who never married, and Regina Harrison Lee, wife of General Stephen D. Lee. Eventually the house was inherited by their son, Blewett Harrison Lee, a practicing lawyer in Chicago. In 1916, he sold the house and entire block to the City of Columbus for use of the city school system, and the Stephen D. Lee High School was built on the square. The wings of the home and outbuildings were removed and the home converted into the home economics building and school cafeteria.

    James T. Harrison Papers, 1770-1896

    [​IMG]


    Temple Heights(
    Brownrigg-Harris-Kennebrew House)
    (c. 1837)

    TYPES:
    Temple Heights is one of the state’s best examples of period restoration. The classically-designed house combines Federal and Greek Revival features. The home includes four floors, porches on three sides, and 14 Doric columns. The home is the setting for historic narratives about 19th century life in Columbus. Temple Heights has been featured in The Magazine Antiques and on HGTV’s Old Homes Restored.

    Dr. and Mrs. Mark Novotny / Mississippi Landmark / National Register / Historic American Buildings Survey

    It was built in 1837 for General Richard T. Brownrigg (1793-1841), a wealthy planter who moved from Chowan County, North Carolina to Columbus, Mississippi in 1835

    [​IMG]


    Waverley Plantation Mansion (c. 1852)
    TYPES:
    Waverley Plantation Mansion exemplifies Southern elegance and beauty. The antebellum home showcases a octagonal shaped cupola to its self-supporting curved stairways, making Waverley one of the most photographed and unique antebellum homes in the South.

    The home has graced the covers of prestigious national and international publications. The home was also featured on the A&E television series, American Castles. Lovingly restored to its former grandeur over a period of more than 25 years by the Robert Snow family, this show place is open year-round.

    Robert Snow Family / National Register / National Historic Landmark / National Restoration Award

    The antebellum home was originally owned by George Hampton Young, a colonel from Georgia. From its accepted date of completion in 1852, the Waverley Plantation was a self-sustaining community, complete with gardens, orchards and livestock. The mansion fell into disrepair following the end of the Young family line in 1913, but was restored by the Robert Snow family beginning in 1962.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Whitehall (c. 1843)
    TYPES:
    Built in 1843 by James Walton Harris, Whitehall was originally designed as a two-story Greek Revival townhouse. The stately mansion exhibits six square, paneled columns at the edge of a wooden porch. The banisters bordering the porch consist of identically-milled hardwood balusters. Inside the home, heart-pine floors and handsome woodwork provide the background for the Boggess’ collection of 18th- and 19th-century antiques.

    Built in 1843 by prominent attorney and planter James Walton Harris, Whitehall is a classic example of Greek Revival architecture. Half-pilasters attached to the façade add a graceful accent to the house. The original property extended over the entire city block and included gardens, stables, a carriage house, and servants' quarters. During the Civil War it served as a hospital for Confederate soldiers.

    Dr. and Mrs. Joe Boggess & Family / National Register / Historic American Buildings Survey
    [​IMG]

    I would the modern tourism of them should be heavily regulated from white people and the homes/land redistributed to black people in the area.

    Or they can burn to the ground at the very least.
     
  2. Citi Trends

    Citi Trends aka milobased

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    Old Fort House/Themerlaine/E. S. Jones home.

    Built by Mrs. Martha Fort in 1844 by slave labor. Two entrances lead to cross halls. Venetian glass surrounds the two doorways. (610—7 St. N.)” Located at 510 7th Street, North, the E. S. Jones Home is has been more widely known throughout its history as the Fort House or Thermerlaine. Thermerlaine is one of five similarly large, columned Columbus Eclectic mansions (Flynnwood, Errolton, and Shadowlawn are some of the others) that once existed. The 1844 date is widely accepted but somewhat problematic; the house may have had multiple periods of construction from the 1830s to the 1850s. The interior has a very vivid decorating scheme created by the DePriest family using designs and materials period to the 1830s to 1850s. It is listed on the National Register, and is not part of the 2016 Pilgrimage.
    [​IMG]

    Amzi Love(Lincoln House) (c.1848)

    TYPES:

    The Amzi Love Home is a popular Pilgrimage tour home in the spring when the azaleas and wisteria are in bloom, but the home is open for tours year-round. The house is intact with original furnishings from 1848 when the house was built. Mr. Sid Caradine, owner and curator, is the seventh generation of his family to live in the house. Beautiful gardens surround the house, and it has been featured in the New York Times travel section.

    The Amzi Love Home is joined to the Lincoln Home by beautiful gardens. The Lincoln Home is a popular bed and breakfast and is one of the oldest pre-Civil War residences. It was once home to one of Columbus’ first mayors, Cicero Lincoln.

    Amzi was a lawyer in the firm of dikkinson, Iron & Love. He also served as Circuit Clerk, Lowndes County, MS 1847-49, 51-53, 57.
    Served in Quartermaster Staff -- CSA -- Held the rank of Major in CSA.

    C. L. Lincoln Home
    , built in 1844 by B. B. Lincoln whose son Col. C. L. Lincoln lived his whole life in this house and died in 1938 at the age of ninety-four. He had the distinction of serving the Confederacy in the War Between the States and later commanded a company in the Spanish-American War. (714—3 Ave. S.)” Still-extant, the Lincoln family lived in the house for well over a century. The house is now used as a bed and breakfast associated with the adjacent Amzi Love House.

    Mr. and Mrs. R. Sidney Caradine, III / National Register
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. AggieLean.

    AggieLean. Black American Cowboy. #PantherPosse

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    Jefferson Davis’ home called Beauvoir is in Biloxi, Miss.

    Old antebellum home/plantation that kids on the coast go to visit for field trips, where they rarely mention anything about the slaves and instead try to glorify the place up.

    Took Mississippi Studies in high school, and they took us there. It was right before Katrina hit, too. Wish it would’ve been destroyed in the hurricane.
     
  4. AggieLean.

    AggieLean. Black American Cowboy. #PantherPosse

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    It’s cringeworthy when I see these neighborhoods calling themselves plantations. I could never own a home in a neighborhood with the word in their title; for example, ‘Duncan’s Plantation’
     
  5. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Don't even get me started. Most are now privately owned and doing tours and events. They rarely mention the enslaved and call them servants. The only one worth visiting is the Whitney Plantation.



    I hate driving past them when I got to Alabama.
     
  6. Get These Nets

    Get These Nets Superstar

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    OP,
    If those places want to capitalize on their antebellum history, PULL THEIR CARDS.

    Oh, it was a plantation before the war? Look up the census information from 1860, the enslaved people will be listed for these plantations. Use the sites/ services that xoxodede has listed before to locate the descendants of those Africans. When the direct descendants of the people enslaved on these "historic" plantations start filing class action lawsuits against those estates, let's see what these "tour guides" say then.

    I am no attorney, but it seems that a reasonable case could be made that the descendants of the enslaved be granted some of the modern day revenue that these "historic sites" generate. Also seems reasonable that they can sue the modern day estates for reparations for that ancestor who was DOCUMENTED to have been enslaved there.

    MFers want to promote and sell that "Scarlett O'hara /gone with the wind stuff?"..PULL THEIR CARDS !
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019
  7. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Yup. Most are under new management or ownership. But, many are still owned by family.

    I think we are about to see this happening shortly. Some of my maternal enslavers owned upscale real estate and land in two counties in Alabama. I am also a direct descendant -- as my 2nd Great Grandfather is theirs as well -- and my mom's great Grandfather. They know - but they also know he was a rapist -- and raped a 13year old.
     
  8. Citi Trends

    Citi Trends aka milobased

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    That is currently what Im in the process of doing by finding out who originally built and owned these homes and who operates them now. Alot of these "sources" like to be very vague when it comes to information surrounding them but I am putting alot of connections together.

    This is something that can be legitimately pushed toward during he reparations fight just by us. This stresses the importance of researching your family.
     
  9. Get These Nets

    Get These Nets Superstar

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    I'm sure it 's happened and is happening and I hope more and more people file lawsuits to claim revenue from plantation tourism. I think possible awards and settlements from those cases would pave the way for suits against the exact institutions and estates that were involved in the slave trade.

    cued up


    Heartbreaking story about your mom's grandmother. The rapes and sexual exploitation of enslaved women is difficult subject for Black men to acknowledge or talk about. I think the "bw" slur and trivializing of it is used to mask the shame that we carry around that these things happened and that our male ancestors were powerless to prevent it from happening. (or take revenge)
    I meet people who speak of white ancestors(rapists and pedos) with admiration and it sickens me.
     
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  10. Citi Trends

    Citi Trends aka milobased

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    I have the census and names of slave owners and i can see the slaves they owned under their name

    the only problem im running into is being able to see/search exact address and reverse searching up to slave descendants

    tips? @xoxodede

    nevermind the exact address part, i got that. it's just finding the direct descendants of the people enslaved
     
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  11. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    I want all Slavery Tourism to cease -- in the states and abroad. If it has to go on -- I want them all to be museum -- with all revenue going back to the descendants of the enslaved.

    Luckily, I haven't met anyone who is proud of their rapist DNA. I know why my mom's Mom maternal family is light-bright damn near white -- it's not out of love. My grandmothers father has the same story.

    My mom left Alabama during the second wave of the Great Migration because my Grannie did not want her or my Aunts to work for white families because it was rampant violence and rape against the young and old Black women in their county.

    Have you read At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance--A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power? It's really good.


     
  12. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Have you looked through Wills and Estate Records?

    If not, go here: Explore Billions of Historical Records — FamilySearch.org

    Put in last name in Search and location (any). Then when results come up -- look up and go to Collections -- go down to "Probate and Court" -- look for surname and click through.

    Also, look at the 1850 Slave Schedule.
     
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  13. Get These Nets

    Get These Nets Superstar

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    Do you remember the Rosewood Massacre?

    When that case eventually settled, the awards were granted to the actual victims and restitution was also granted to descendants of those victims in the form of partial scholarships. At that point, it was on the descendants to be able to establish blood lineage from the victims.
    Look up the wording of that settlement.

    And if you're moving forward, do so in silence. White folks will restructure paperwork and ownership if they think you're coming for their money.

    Wish you success.
     
  14. Citi Trends

    Citi Trends aka milobased

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    Thank you and yeah, I know this can't be a singular effort and that it will require those specifically descended from them to trace their root themselves.
    I was thinking of a way to contact a few people or compile the information

    I'm looking through the 1850 ss/familysearch now. I haven't done the probate and court thing.
    And I will check out the estate records
     
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  15. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    You can also call the plantations and ask what surnames where attached to the plantation. Then search those surnames on the census and locally.

    Usually the descendants still live in the area. Some don't even know their ancestors were enslaved at those plantations.

    You should watch this. He goes through the process of how we reached out to those his ancestors enslaved.

     

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