What kinda culture do African-Canadians have?

Discussion in 'The Root' started by MR. WEST, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. ATLANTA

    ATLANTA Superstar Supporter

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    i have to bump this thread cause its funny to me. I wonder if this poster is still on the site. Years later we see a rising populist movement in Canada that may get bigger if they elect Scheer and I'm sure this poster regrets making those comments. Acting as if world class education and health care stops racism.
     
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  2. Intruder v3.0

    Intruder v3.0 SOHH Class of 2003 and CASUAL sports fan

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    :mjlol: @ "African-Canadians"

    People are just black, brehs. Aint not African-Canadian or African-French or African whatever. Even "Afro-latinos" is a term that's mostly used in the united states. Most black latinos i know refer to themselves as "negro" or "negra/negrita" which means "black".

    Hell the word "hispanic" was invented by the U.S. census bureau if im not mistaken so they can just pile up latinos of various different origins into one category

    What's next? African-Haitians and African-jamaicans?
     
  3. Indiglow Meta (R$G)

    Indiglow Meta (R$G) Ultra.

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    The only real Afro-Canadians are Scotians...who are simply AAs that crossed a border after fighting 2 wars for this country's "existence".
    I put that in quotation marks because it's redundant.
    Jamaican, Haitian, Nigerian, Somali etc up here don't call themselves just "black" unless they're in trouble or there's a use for it. They go by Nationality. At best, their parents got here in the 80s/90s, so they use "Afro-Canadian" to legitimize their presence. They're just as Canadian as a Euro that comes here, and this is as much their home as a cac's.
    AA is an established ethnic group/Nationality.
    Afro-Canadian is a new tentative identity.
     
  4. K.Dot

    K.Dot African American

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    I thought Canada had non immigrant black people like the US at the time of me making the thread.
     
  5. penfieId

    penfieId #Hustlebooty

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    University of Toronto is a top 20 school. You dumb fukk ... I’m so glad you offend yourself. The forum is so much better with you gone.
     
  6. penfieId

    penfieId #Hustlebooty

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    They are in Nova Scotia. They are called Scotians. Basically red neck blacks.
     
  7. ATLANTA

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    You are making great points and the ADOS movement should bring this up also. It does sound weird.

    I can understand them wanting to self identify though. They are a very small number in a large country like Canada and then the Caribbean and African immigrants all alienate themselves from Scotians

    Maybe Black Scotians and ADOS should team up? :whoo:
     
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  8. ATLANTA

    ATLANTA Superstar Supporter

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    Um... :dahell: Maybe its time you yourself need to be banned
     
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  9. Intruder v3.0

    Intruder v3.0 SOHH Class of 2003 and CASUAL sports fan

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    You misunderstood my mentioning "african-haitian" and the "just black" comment. I was just giving an example of terms that are not used in other countries by prefixing it with "african". I've said many times that to me, "African-Americans" are just Americans who just happen to be black to me. You're as american as your white counterparts yet i dont hear them prefixing it with Euro-American. But again, that's not my fight so i just go with it as you wish.

    Canadians who are black refer to themselves as black. Not "African Canadian". Canadians who are immigrants refer to themselves as whatever nationality they fall under. I go to Montreal and visit some of my haitian friends up there sometimes (Laval area). My homegirl who was born there, grew up with me in Haiti but has lived there since her late teens refers to other blacks as either "african" if she dont know their country of origin in Africa, or their specific nationality if she knows or can guess. She refers to black canadians as "black canadians". Ive never heard a black french person refer to themselves as "français-Afriquain"

    I'm just saying they dont refer to themselves as "african-canadians" or "african-whatever"
     
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  10. Indiglow Meta (R$G)

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    Canada does have non immigrant black people.
    How you gonna tell me about where I LIVE?
     
  11. Indiglow Meta (R$G)

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    We're the same Ethnic group, so we're already "teamed up".
     
  12. Intruder v3.0

    Intruder v3.0 SOHH Class of 2003 and CASUAL sports fan

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    YOU go with whatever terms YOU feel comfortable defining YOU, breh. :hubie:
    Like i said it's not my business to define you as a people. I just made an observation. Last time i mentioned the quoted below on this forum
    "... to me, "African-Americans" are just Americans who just happen to be black to me so i usually just say "black americans". You're as american as your white counterparts yet i dont hear them prefixing it with Euro-American"

    After making that statement I was accused of trying to "deprive african american their africanness " (for lack of a better word). As if i was trying to deny them their right to claim their african ancestry by prefixing their nationality with "african".
    Some people can take certain things way deeper than they really need to. I didnt want that beef :whoa:
     
  13. Intruder v3.0

    Intruder v3.0 SOHH Class of 2003 and CASUAL sports fan

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    What about all the former slaves from the United States that escaped to Canada between the 1600s and 1900s to escape slavery? You're counting them as Canadian or American? At what point does one become American? At what point does one become Canadian?

    If a black man from Africa arrived in the U.S. in 1640 and escaped to Canada in 1660, what is he? What are his descendants born in Canada considered? How long do your ancestors have to go back on the land for you to claim it? What about those last slaves that were brought to America in the late 1860s mentioned in the article below that was 19 y/o when he was captured in the 860s and lived well into the 1930s. Can his great grand-children claim to be American by your standard?

    https://www.history.com/news/zora-neale-hurston-barrac00n-slave-clotilda-survivor
    The Last Slave Ship Survivor Gave an Interview in the 1930s. It Just Surfaced
    Zora Neale Hurston's searing book about the final survivor of the transatlantic slave trade, Cudjo Lewis, could not find a publisher for nearly 90 years.
    BECKY LITTLE
    Roughly 60 years after the abolition of slavery, anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston made an incredible connection: She located the last surviving captive of the last slave ship to bring Africans to the United States.

    Hurston, a known figure of the Harlem Renaissance who would later write the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, conducted interviews with the survivor but struggled to publish them as a book in the early 1930s. In fact, they are only now being released to the public in a book called Barrac00n: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” that comes out on May 8, 2018.

    The Harlem Renaissance

    Hurston’s book tells the story of Cudjo Lewis, who was born in what is now the West African country of Benin. Originally named Kossula, he was only 19 years old when members of the neighboring Dahomian tribe captured him and took him to the coast. There, he and about 120 others were sold into slavery and crammed onto the Clotilda, the last slave ship to reach the continental United States.

    The Clotilda brought its captives to Alabama in 1860, just a year before the outbreak of the Civil War. Even though slavery was legal at that time in the U.S., the international slave trade was not, and hadn’t been for over 50 years. Along with many European nations, the U.S. had outlawed the practice in 1807, but Lewis’ journey is an example of how slave traders went around the law to continue bringing over human cargo.

    uncovered in January 2018).

    Read more: Is This the Wreck of the Last U.S. Slave Ship?

    Most poignantly, Lewis’ narrative provides a first-hand account of the disorienting trauma of slavery. After being abducted from his home, Lewis was forced onto a ship with strangers. The abductees spent several months together during the treacherous passage to the United States, but were then separated in Alabama to go to different plantations.

    “We very sorry to be parted from one ’nother,” Lewis told Hurston. “We seventy days cross de water from de Affica soil, and now dey part us from one ’nother. Derefore we cry. Our grief so heavy look lak we cain stand it. I think maybe I die in my sleep when I dream about my mama.”

    Lewis also describes what it was like to arrive on a plantation where no one spoke his language, and could explain to him where he was or what was going on. “We doan know why we be bring ’way from our country to work lak dis,” he told Hurston. “Everybody lookee at us strange. We want to talk wid de udder colored folkses but dey doan know whut we say.”

    As for the Civil War, Lewis said he wasn’t aware of it when it first started. But part-way through, he began to hear that the North had started a war to free enslaved people like him. A few days after Confederate General Robert E. Leesurrendered in April 1865, Lewis says that a group of Union soldiers stopped by a boat on which he and other enslaved people were working and told them they were free.

    Lewis expected to receive compensation for being kidnapped and forced into slavery, and was angry to discover that emancipation didn’t come with the promise of “forty acres and a mule,” or any other kind of reparations. Frustrated by the refusal of the government to provide him with land to live on after stealing him away from his homeland, he and a group of 31 other freepeople saved up money to buy land near the state capital of Mobile, which they called Africatown.

    Hurston’s use of vernacular dialogue in both her novels and her anthropological interviews was often controversial, as some black American thinkers at the time argued that this played to black caricatures in the minds of white people. Hurston disagreed, and refused to change Lewis’ dialect—which was one of the reasons a publisher turned her manuscript down back in the 1930s.

    Many decades later, her principled stance means that modern readers will get to hear Lewis’ story the way that he told it.

    Not arguing but just asking because ive met many black canadians who claim to have no African or Caribbean roots. I didnt ask them for a ancestry DNA receipt so you tell me :yeshrug:
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2019
  14. penfieId

    penfieId #Hustlebooty

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    Suck my dikk wench

    Scotians love cacs and feel closer to cacs than first or second generation immigrants. I don’t care tho it is what it is.
     
  15. Indiglow Meta (R$G)

    Indiglow Meta (R$G) Ultra.

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    They're Scotian.
    Barrac00n was edited
    @xoxodede
     

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