Confirmed: Wreck of last slave ship from Africa located off Alabama coast

Discussion in 'The Root' started by xoxodede, May 22, 2019.

  1. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    [​IMG]

    Researchers have located the remains of the last known ship to have brought slaves to the U.S. from West Africa, Alabama historical officials announced Wednesday.

    The Alabama Historical Commission confirmed that the Gulf schooner Clotilda was identified and verified after months of assessment.

    "For nearly 160 years, the waters around Mobile have concealed the final destination of the Gulf Schooner Clotilda,” the commission said in a statement.

    "The discovery of the Clotilda is an extraordinary archaeological find," said Lisa Demetropoulos Jones, executive director of the commission. "The voyage represented one of the darkest eras of modern history and is a profound discovery of the tangible evidence of slavery."

    In 1860, Clotilda illegally transported 110 men, women and children to Mobile from what is now the African country of Benin. The ship was then taken into delta waters north of the port and burned.

    The dimensions and construction of the wreck match those of the Clotilda, the commission said, as do building materials including locally sourced lumber and metal pieces made from pig iron. There are also signs of fire.

    "We are cautious about placing names on shipwrecks that no longer bear a name or something like a bell with the ship's name on it," maritime archaeologist James Delgado said in a statement. "But the physical and forensic evidence powerfully suggests that this is Clotilda."

    According to National Geographic, the smuggling venture originated with a wager by wealthy Mobile landowner and shipbuilder Tim Meaher, who bet a group of Northern businessmen that he could bring slaves to Alabama.

    Importing slaves into the U.S. had been illegal since 1808 and federal anti-piracy laws had been changed in 1820 to make participating in the trade punishable by death. However, the ban did not deter smugglers who traveled the Atlantic with wooden ships full of people in chains. Southern plantation owners needed workers for their cotton fields.

    According to the online Encyclopedia of Alabama, approximately 25 of the Africans who were taken on board the Clotilda were sold to slave traders. Sixty others were divvied up between Meaher and two of his relatives, while "between five and eight" were given to the ship's captain, William Foster as payment for the voyage.

    The captives were freed from slavery following the Civil War and about 30 of them used the money earned working in fields, homes and vessels to purchase land from the Meaher family and settle in a community still known to this day as Africatown.

    "Residents of Africatown have carried the memory of their ancestors who were forcefully and violently migrated from Africa to the shores of Alabama," the commission said. "Since then, the final chapter of the Clotilda story has been shrouded in mystery."

    The commission is expected to release the full report on their investigation into Clotilda next week at a community celebration in Africatown.

    Wreck of last slave ship from Africa located off Alabama coast
     
  2. OfTheCross

    OfTheCross Superstar

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    Why wouldn't it just dock on the East coast ?
     
  3. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Captain Foster was working for Timothy Meaher, a wealthy Mobile shipyard owner and steamboat captain, who had built Clotilda in 1856 for the lumber trade.[7] Meaher was said to have wagered some "Northern gentlemen" from New England, who likely provided the financing for the illegal venture,[citation needed] that he could successfully smuggle slaves into the US despite the 1807 Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves.​

    It was a bet -- and illegal.
     
  4. ItsMeButters

    ItsMeButters The Picasso of the Ghetto

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    subs
     
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  5. OfTheCross

    OfTheCross Superstar

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  6. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Someone needs to do a GoFundMe for AfricaTown.

    The song at the end gave me chills and tingles.
     
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  7. Cold Blooded

    Cold Blooded ShowTime LWO Supporter

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    :shaq2:
     
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  8. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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  9. Cadillac

    Cadillac Veteran

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    and you got idiots like swag who deny stuff like this.

    not even gon @ him because he will stray this whole thread from its purpose
     
  10. TheKongoEmpire

    TheKongoEmpire A Wilsonian Garveyite

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    Paging Dane Calloway and his copper-colored, indigenous alt-Negroids.
     
  11. Araña

    Araña #LORD SNOW??

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    They have evidence of slavery, but don’t want to pay up reparations. They need to cut the check, all them countries who participated and got wealthy of slavery and mass genocide need to CTC.
     
  12. 2Quik4UHoes

    2Quik4UHoes Good lookin out hawey.... Supporter

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    Yeah it was a booming illegal slave trade even after America and other countries outlawed the import of enslaved Africans. In fact, Americans were among the most active in the Brazilian trade as well going all the way up to the Civil War.
     
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  13. 606onit

    606onit Superstar

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    That's why we need #TANGIBLES2020.
    We riding for our tribe! :birdman:
     
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  14. Mhofu

    Mhofu Rookie

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  15. For Da Bag

    For Da Bag Superstar

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    I'd like to know how the ship got wrecked.
     

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