Hoodoo Was Immensely Feared Back in The Day & Other Vintage Newspaper Clippings

Discussion in 'The Root' started by xoxodede, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    6,495
    Daps Received:
    29,342
    Reppin:
    Michigan/Atlanta
    Reputation:
    5,630
    Coli Cash:
    $200500.00

    Well-acquainted with Mr. Hyatt -- and his volumes of fieldwork. Thanks for sharing the links - hopefully more folks read the volumes of work.

    And yeah... I'm not a fan of Lucky Mojo.
     
    NoCones, HarlemHottie and Carolina dapped this.
  2. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    6,495
    Daps Received:
    29,342
    Reppin:
    Michigan/Atlanta
    Reputation:
    5,630
    Coli Cash:
    $200500.00

    Yup.

    This is a great book on the topic: Working Cures: Healing, Health, and Power on Southern Slave Plantations (Gender and American Culture)

    The book below came out last month. I still need to order. My Great Grannie and 2nd/3rd Great Grannies were midwives - my Granny didn't continue the legacy - but my Great Aunt her sister did. I wish she would have.


    Working the Roots: Over 400 Years of Traditional African American Healing
    [​IMG]
     
    litty, NoCones, Tony_Bromo and 4 others dapped this.
  3. im_sleep

    im_sleep All Star

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,976
    Daps Received:
    10,229
    Reputation:
    910
    Coli Cash:
    $500.00

    Good lookin out. I’m gonna add these books to my wish list.
     
    Tony_Bromo and xoxodede dapped this.
  4. repciprocity

    repciprocity All Star

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Messages:
    1,026
    Daps Received:
    3,327
    Reputation:
    830
    Coli Cash:
    $500.00

    I got this book shortly after it came out, on a whim. Fantastic work. It is a lil integrationist for me but that makes sense coming from the author, no shade!! I was expecting something different but that book is yet to be written. All that being said I highly recommend and with that, this book should be much more expensive. Spiderwebs can heal semi-severed toes? and the bone too?????:mindblown:
     
    xoxodede dapped this.
  5. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    6,495
    Daps Received:
    29,342
    Reppin:
    Michigan/Atlanta
    Reputation:
    5,630
    Coli Cash:
    $200500.00

    I am so cheap - cause - I am a used book person -- or I get stuff off Archives.org. But, I am going to drop the money and buy it.

    Tell us more about the author.... she talking about Native Americans contributions huh?

    I saw this last month.



    That's crazy. Anymore tidbits like spiderwebs? And how do they do that?

    Let me go buy the book...lol.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
    CharlieManson, tuckdog and medase dapped this.
  6. repciprocity

    repciprocity All Star

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Messages:
    1,026
    Daps Received:
    3,327
    Reputation:
    830
    Coli Cash:
    $500.00

    Yeah she is i think 1/3rd chinese 1/3 AA and 1/3 mixed up with Native American Indian so she says that kinda stuff. Prob without her TCM background she wouldn't have done this a lot tbh. I think i got it around like march or may but it just released in Dec of 2017. She also has a lot in there that would make the we've always been here gang typehype because some of the interviewees (imo unfortunately) say we've been here and that kinda stuff so thats usually the context that the indian stuff is brought up.

    In it there was a lot of good stuff about like using turpentine, making your own like chest rubs like Vicks and a lot of stuff that made some of the things my parents and grandma have talked about make more sense. Made me want to ask my gma about some of the stuff, but a lot of that was so long ago, and some of that with my gma, I think right now its grouped with what growing up in the 30s in the south was like so..yeaaaaaah. The first part of the book is narratives from the interviews she conducted with a bunch of black folks. The spiderweb one was very cool, the water diviner was prob one of my favorites because the story he told was so vivid. The second part of the book is a bunch of recipes. If you were to rent it or whatever, nah, because you are going to want your own fresh copy fr fr. Some of the women in there talk about never getting sick ever. I often put this book down with that " THE IMPLICATIONS!!!! :ohhh:" feelings after reading an interview.


    African American Slave Medicine is the more academic version of this book. Recommend it too, but it doesn't make for as "good" of a read. If you are clever with tracing the image url you'll find it for the low-low

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
    Azik, fairfax12, HarlemHottie and 4 others dapped this.
  7. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    6,495
    Daps Received:
    29,342
    Reppin:
    Michigan/Atlanta
    Reputation:
    5,630
    Coli Cash:
    $200500.00

    Thanks for the review! I just ordered it. I will make sure to let you know after I have read it.

    Oh...shes one of them -- who list and claims all of their DNA.

    I have own and have read "Slave Medicine" - I actually got it after I read Hyatts volumes years ago - cause of what some of the remedies the "informants" shared.

    Have you read: Folk beliefs of the southern Negro : Puckett, Newbell Niles : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
     
    im_sleep dapped this.
  8. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    6,495
    Daps Received:
    29,342
    Reppin:
    Michigan/Atlanta
    Reputation:
    5,630
    Coli Cash:
    $200500.00

    Lecture 9 - Author Michele Lee: Working the Roots - Over 400 Years of African American Healing





    Video Description:

    This is the 9th lecture that is part of a project to gather postpartum traditions, to expose current postpartum experiences and to define postpartum justice. The UC Berkeley course is titled Ethnic Studies 199/ Asian American Studies 199: Traditional Postpartum Wisdom: Implications for Contemporary Postpartum Justice. -------------------------------------

    -------- Michele E. Lee AUTHOR, WORKING THE ROOTS: OVER 400 YEARS OF TRADITIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN HEALING WE ARE STILL HERE! Resiliency, Ingenuity and Perseverance. All we have is the spoken word of our ancestors, those who survived the middle passage and breathed life into their descendants, born into a life of unspeakable terror and oceans of love from the community Michele E. Lee and Yemanya Napue tap into the deep ancestral knowledge and wisdom of how African Americans survived, continued birthing babies, cared for self, their babies, and were wet nurses for the "masters" baby, and other enslaved babies all the while surviving through slavery and jim crow.... to build a tradition. Much of the lecture will be based on the recently published book Working the Roots: Over 400 Years of Traditional African American Healing. First-hand accounts are integrated with the historical realities of this time and birthing and care through the continuing legacy of colonization and slavery. Special guest along with Ms. Lee is Yemanya Napue, a direct descendant and citizen of the all Black and Native town, Nicodemus, Kansas, established after slavery along with their 40 acres and a mule. Michele E. Lee is the author of the recently published book, "Working The Roots: Over 400 Years of Traditional African American Healing." A journey that took 22 years to produce. Born into a family of traditional healers from the south, Lee began documenting the medicinal practice in her family whose legacy reaches back 7 generations in mississippi and louisiana. Her family tree also weaves in and out of the south eastern Native communities and also includes the Mississippi Chinese. And then for 4 years, she lived down a dirt road in rural North Carolina seeking out more knowledge and wisdom from traditional healers and root workers throughout the south. Michele Elizabeth Lee has worked for over 30 years in the integrated arts as a researcher, writer, visual artist, administrator, curator and educator. She has a MFA from the University of Southern California and a BA from Antioch College. She currently lives and works in her native Oakland where she teaches art in a public school. She has two adult children, Milon and Nora.
     
  9. HarlemHottie

    HarlemHottie Uptown Thoroughbred

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2018
    Messages:
    3,071
    Daps Received:
    12,344
    Reppin:
    #ADOS
    Reputation:
    2,170
    Coli Cash:
    $500.00

    Oh snap, I just read about this in a novel.

     
    NoCones, medase, Carolina and 1 other person dapped this.
  10. T'krm

    T'krm All Star

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2014
    Messages:
    2,546
    Daps Received:
    8,484
    Reppin:
    BA DOS Af pr
    Reputation:
    540
    Coli Cash:
    $250500.00

    Since many of the slaves taken to the Caribbean, and arriving mainland were often times perceivably from different groups, wonder what relationship 'Hoodoo' shares with Voodoo, or Santeria?
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
    xoxodede dapped this.
  11. HarlemHottie

    HarlemHottie Uptown Thoroughbred

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2018
    Messages:
    3,071
    Daps Received:
    12,344
    Reppin:
    #ADOS
    Reputation:
    2,170
    Coli Cash:
    $500.00

    I think I might come from a family that did this. But yall know how old southern ppl are, they don't be telling you shyt, plus, my grandmother died before I was born. I ended up needing to know herbalism, so I went and learned it. Later, talking to aunties down south, I found out that the issue I'd been having was an inherited one. My grandmother suffered from it as do several of my cousins.

    Apparently, my grandmother cured herself, but the only tidbit I could ferret out was that she used a boiled potato. Obscure af! :pachaha:Also, she read medical books at night and diagnosed my grandfather's diabetes from his urine. :ehh:


    So anyway, I'm an AA who practices herbalism, but not a hoodoo practioner. But old southern ppl trust me enough to come to me, so I must seem familiar enough.

    Some years ago, I was sent to the Lucky Mojo site. :beli: :martin: :comeon:.Had to have a chat with the girl who gave me the link.
     
    staticshock, litty, Pclarkrsa and 3 others dapped this.
  12. Get These Nets

    Get These Nets Superstar

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,116
    Daps Received:
    39,059
    Reputation:
    3,290
    Coli Cash:
    $500.00

    All three are new world composite spiritual systems. They incorporate elements of all the ethnic groups of the enslaved Africans in a region or colony, but the dominant group(s) will have had the greatest input.
    As pointed out earlier by Charlie..systems from the Catholic colonies incorporated/blended elements from that church., but Santeria is heavily Yoruba......Vodou is heavily from people in modern day Benin. I am not sure what the dominant ethnic group was that had greatest influence on Hoodoo. I am certain that there is cultural overlap between all the new world systems.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
    xoxodede dapped this.
  13. $cam-U-Well_Jack$on

    $cam-U-Well_Jack$on All Star

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    3,906
    Daps Received:
    7,757
    Reppin:
    404/678/770 тσ 702
    Reputation:
    670
    Coli Cash:
    $100500.00

    Those Lucky Mojo types, Momma Kat, are known to marginalize black folks. Furthermore, within da AA community, particularly da South, Hoodoo never went anywhere. It's so ingrained in da culture and certain families that they don't look at it as it is, most don't have da eyes to see and if you around da old heads enough, you'll hear shyt slip from time to time that's "normal" on top of being practiced under da guise of Christianity. But yes, a lot of black folks are afraid of their own spiritual practices.
     
    NoCones, im_sleep and xoxodede dapped this.
  14. $cam-U-Well_Jack$on

    $cam-U-Well_Jack$on All Star

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    3,906
    Daps Received:
    7,757
    Reppin:
    404/678/770 тσ 702
    Reputation:
    670
    Coli Cash:
    $100500.00

    Hoodoo stems from da Kongo. As far as Vodou (Ayisen), Petwo Lwa draws from da more fiery, aggressive spirits of da Kongo (unlike da Rada Lwa) as well as there being a Kongo nachon. Hoodoo has nothing to do with Lukumi. Lukumi is influenced by Yorubaland. Hoodoo, Kongo. Those of Yorubaland (West Afrika) & Kongo, Central Afrika, are said to have been rivals.
     
    im_sleep, T'krm and xoxodede dapped this.
  15. Take It In Blood

    Take It In Blood Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2017
    Messages:
    14,087
    Daps Received:
    70,289
    Reppin:
    Golden Era
    Reputation:
    2,830
    Coli Cash:
    $100.00

    We're still extremely superstitious collectively unfortunately
     
    Pclarkrsa dapped this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice