Hoodoo Was Immensely Feared Back in The Day & Other Vintage Newspaper Clippings

Discussion in 'The Root' started by xoxodede, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. EndDomination

    EndDomination Veteran Supporter

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    I spent several months studying Hoodoo, its incorporation into the Southern African-American Christian tradition (specifically Pentecostal denominations), is absolutely fascinating, and provides an odd cognitive-dissonance for AA Christians; they reject the occult, yet intimate practices in their own denominations are intertwined with traditional African religious practices (painted as "pagan.")
     
  2. AlainLocke

    AlainLocke Veteran

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    Hoodoo has no relationship with Santeria or Voodoo...outside of having a basis in African folk medicine and folk magic

    Hoodoo isn't a religion...it's simply Southern USA folk magick and folk medicine...while still being Protestant...like a Hoodoo practioner doesn't worship orishas and etc

    Voodoo, Santeria, Quimbanda and etc are Afro Ameeican religions that are cloaked in Catholicism...there is a fundamental Catholic symbols associated with African deities

    Hoodoo or Conjure does not have this...

    American slaves for the most part, were full blown traditional Christians...

    American slaves used the Bible and Judeo Christian texts like the 6th and 7th book of Moses for their magickal system...

    It was basically Christian White magick

    Which is why I always say that American DOS are the most European...other DOS were able to maintain their African dieties and their religious culture by hiding it in Catholicism

    So from outside you may think they are worshiping a Christian saint but they really worshipping Shango...

    Whereas American slaves threw their gods away and adopted Judeo Christian beliefs and added African, Native American and European folk practices aka rootwork

    American slaves were really talking about Moses and King Solomon...it's not coded language

    The only true stronghold of Afro American religious beliefs in the USA is Louisiana Voodoo...and where African gods are still worshipped...but that is because of the Catholicism hiding the African religion...Louisiana was a French and Spanish colony..

    Spanish and Portuguese and French slavery was totally different and the slaves were different...South America was constantly receiving fresh slaves from Africa and after awhile in the USA...the slaves were homegrown...as the USA stopped importing slaves in 1807

    South American and Caribbean were more rebellious and they were more educated overall (American slaves weren't being taught Greek philosophy like Toussaint Louverture was as a slave)...and their owners were less brutal with their racism (still was very fukking bad though...Brazil was the last Western nation to get rid of slavery yet only 3/4s of Blacks were free by 1872..)

    So more of the African culture remained
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2019
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  3. King Khufu

    King Khufu CARTEL MAFIA GANG

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    Ashe. Dope thread.

    We always called it roots though.
     
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  4. T'krm

    T'krm All Star

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    Really? :why:
    Understand the systematic deculturing in some ways was much more intense, but that's a weird theory. If Hoodoo wasn't based upon some measure of related WA spirituality then what does it account for: superstitious mysticism of some sort?
     
  5. AlainLocke

    AlainLocke Veteran

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    It's the truth...Hoodoo isn't based on West African spirituality like that...it's mostly just a West African/Native American/European folk magick and mixed with Christian White magick...

    A good historical example of this belief system is Moses, Man of the Mountain by Zora Neale Hurston...which is a reinterpretation of Moses as a Hoodoo man...

    American slaves did not hold on to African beliefs...they just fit their beliefs to fit Judeo-Christianity...so Moses and King Solomon are Hoodoo men...guys with powers...


    Like for example...I knew a guy that practice Conjure/Root Work/Hoodoo...whatever you wanna call it...he was a Christian...he used Psalms to cast spells...a very European Judeo-Christian thing...

    A Santeria/Voudon/Candomble and etc practitioner wouldn't do that...spell casting isn't really in African belief systems like that...African belief systems use possession...so you are possessed by the god and the god works through you...you don't use the Bible...Afro-American religious practitioners aren't Christians...

    People that practice Hoodoo are Christians...


    Santeria and etc are full on African religious systems with their own hierarchy for their practitioners, gods, beliefs and practices...

    Hoodoo/JuJu/Conjure/Mojo is simply a folk magickal system and medicinal practice from Africans/Native American/European beliefs...without the theology...

    A better way to put it...There are African Muslims that practice West African folk magic...but they believe in Allah and do all the Muslim rites and if you told them they ain't Muslim because they cursed somebody using Juju...they would look at you crazy.. That's just part of their folk beliefs...same thing with Hoodoo and Christianity...

    My momma's people from Louisiana...everybody from Louisiana...where you find the purest form of Afro-American religion in the USA... for the most part back in those days believed some sort folk magic...but they were Christian...ultimately...and you had a few true Voodoo practitioners that weren't Christian...but the Voodoo Man and Christian man back then both didn't leave their hair and nails laying around out of fear being cursed...

    Both went to the root lady when they were sick or wanted to bag a shorty...but at the end of the day...the Voodoo man prayed to African gods and the Christian man prayed to Jesus...
     
  6. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Great post - but I don't know if I agree with you 100% here....

    First, let's make sure to differentiate "Louisiana Voodoo," West African "Vodun" and Haitian "Vodu/Vodou."

    "Louisiana Voodoo" or just "Voodoo" -- and Haitian "Vodu/Vodou" come from "West African Vodun."

    "Louisiana Voodoo" is similar - but not the same as Haitian Vodou." As Lousiana Voodoo is watered down-- and what white people (and a lot of Black ones too) think of when they think of Voodoo dolls and curse, etc.

    Speaking on "Hoodoo" and "Conjure" only -- since that is what I know most about -- is rooted in African Traditional beliefs and religions. Many enslaved Africans - did indeed hold on to their African Religious beliefs -- some just didn't know that they were "African" and that they came from their ancestors who were brought over.

    Hoodoo is a mixture of West African beliefs and practices. "Hoodoo" stems from Hudu, which is the name of a language and a Ewe tribe in Togo and Ghana.

    Yes, Christianity was used and intertwined with "Hoodoo" by many ---- but not everyone uses -- or has used Christian beliefs when practicing "Hoodoo."

    Especially, during our ancestors enslavement and after -- as many were not reading the Bible, or repeating Psalms -- or praying to Jesus.

    On European Folk Magick:

    I am always confused and intrigued when people say "Hoodoo" has "European Folk Magick" -- I don't understand how - when the enslaved had their own beliefs and had to doctor themselves. Those beliefs became "hoodoo."

    If you are talking about Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses -- Yes -- it was used and incorporated by many who practiced "hoodoo" later on -- but many didn't used it at all. Cause they couldn't read -- and didn't have access to the book.

    Sixth and Seventh Moses was not used by us until the mid/late 1920s-early 30's. That is when Black Spiritualism started to pop off really heavy -- with the help of The Great Migration.

    The boom in inexpensive publishing, and the interest in Spiritualism helped the work gain popularity in the African American population of the southern United States, and from there, the Anglophone parts of the Caribbean. Source: Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses - Wikipedia

    [​IMG]


    Southern AA's hoodoo - not New Orleans/Louisiana is ROOTED in a mixture of African practices only -- not a specific African religion per say. But, with time the bible was used.

    But, New Orleans/Louisiana Voodoo is syncretized with the Catholic and Francophone culture of New Orleans as a result of the African cultural oppression in the region resulting from the Atlantic slave trade. Louisiana Voodoo is often confused with—but is not completely separable from—Haitian Vodou and Deep Southern Hoodoo. It differs from Haitian Vodou in its emphasis upon gris-gris, Voodoo queens, use of Hoodoo paraphernalia, and Li Grand Zombi. It was through Louisiana Voodoo that such terms as gris-gris (a Wolof term)[citation needed] and "Voodoo dolls"' were introduced into the American lexicon.

    [​IMG]
    And many used "Hoodoo" and called it "Roots" -- or the "Root Doctor" -- as @King Khufu mentioned. Also, when they used "roots" - as folk-healing/doctoring many went to "Hoodoo" or "Root" doctors and/or "mid-wives" -- for the items - or instructions.

    Ms. Hurston acknowledges this:
    [​IMG]

    More on Hoodoo:
    According to Carolyn Morrow Long, "At the time of the slave trade, the traditional nature-centered religions of West and Central Africa were characterized by the concept that human well-being is governed by spiritual balance, by devotion to a supreme creator and a pantheon of lesser deities, by veneration and propitiation of the ancestors, and by the use of charms to embody spiritual power. . . . In traditional West African thought, the goal of all human endeavor was to achieve balance." Several African spiritual traditions recognized a genderless supreme being who created the world, was neither good nor evil, and which did not concern itself with the affairs of mankind. Lesser spirits were invoked to gain aid for humanity's problems.[8]

    Since the 19th century there has been Christian influence in hoodoo thought.[7] This is particularly evident in relation to God's providence and his role in retributive justice. For example, though there are strong ideas of good versus evil, cursing someone to cause their death might not be considered a malignant act. One practitioner explained it as follows:

    "[In h]oodooism, anythin' da' chew do is de plan of God undastan', God have somepin to do wit evah' thin' you do if it's good or bad, He's got somepin to do wit it ... jis what's fo' you, you'll git it."[9]

    "([In h]oodooism, anything that you do is the plan of God, understand? God has something to do with everything that you do whether it's good or bad, he's got something to do with it... You'll get what's coming to you)"

    Not only is the Yahweh's providence a factor in hoodoo practice, but hoodoo thought understands that deity as the archetypal hoodoo doctor. On this matter Zora Neal Hurston stated, "The way we tell it, hoodoo started way back there before everything. Six days of magic spells and mighty words and the world with its elements above and below was made."[10] From this perspective, biblical figures are often recast as hoodoo doctors and the Bible becomes a source of spells and is, itself, used as a protective talisman.[11] This can be understood as a syncretic adaptation for the religion. By blending the ideas laid out by the Christian Bible, the faith is made more acceptable. This combines the teachings of Christianity that Africans brought to America were given and the traditional beliefs they brought with them.

    The newest work on Hoodoo lays out a model of hoodoo origins and development. Mojo Workin:The Old African American Hoodoo System by Katrina Hazzard-Donald, Ph.D. discusses what the author calls "the ARC or African Religion Complex which was a collection of eight traits which all the enslaved Africans had in common and were somewhat familiar to all held in the agricultural slave labor camps known as plantations communities. Those traits included naturopathic medicine, ancestor reverence, counter clockwise sacred circle dancing, blood sacrifice, divination, supernatural source of malady, water immersion and spirit possession. These traits allowed Culturally diverse Africans to find common culturo-spiritual ground. According to the author, hoodoo developed under the influence of that complex, the African divinities moved back into their natural forces, unlike in the Caribbean and Latin America where the divinities moved into Catholic saints. This work also discusses the misunderstood "High John the Conqueror root" and myth as well as the incorrectly-discussed "nature sack."[12]
     
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  7. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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  8. $cam-U-Well_Jack$on

    $cam-U-Well_Jack$on All Star

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    A lot of misinformation is beginning to be spewed as facts. I'll be back to this thread after work.
     
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  9. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    Please do! Looking forward to it!
     
  10. AlainLocke

    AlainLocke Veteran

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    I agree with this...I think we are saying the same thing but I am comparing the West African religion with Santeria and etc and Hoodooo....and it's level of "West Africanness" today. BTW I ain't saying Hoodoo is bad or whatever. Hoodoo is cool to me.

    Afro-American religions still have a African origin story of how man and gods came to be...they have their own thing. If you practice Hoodoo today you don't get the orishas or exus...you don't go through being initiated and getting in contact with your ancestors...you don't have to do those things...You don't have to learn aspects of a West African language to be able to communicate the religious ideas...

    West African religion mainly is initiatory. Hoodoo generally isn't.

    In Louisiana Vodou, you still work with a West African pantheon alongside using the Bible. It's not the same with Hoodoo widely practiced today. That's what I am saying when I am talking about Louisiana Vodou is the stronghold of Afro-American religion in the USA.


    Here's a good website that does a good comparison. It's by a Santeria church in the USA and it collaborates your post well.

    What is the difference between Voodoo, Hoodoo and Santeria?
    Louisiana Vodoun is markedly different from Haitian Vodou. It is more of an amalgamation of religious and magical practices found in the southern United States. This includes some of the Lwa found in Haitian Vodou, a strong presence of the Catholic Saints, and elements of southern folk magic like gris-gris, wanga and mojo bags. There is not a “regleman” in the same manner as Haitian Vodou and there is more of an emphasis on self-made Vodou Queens like the famous Marie Laveau. Louisiana Vodoun has a strong connection with Spiritualism and shares many magical techniques with Hoodoo (southern folk magic) – but should not be confused with Hoodoo. You will see the use of veves (ornate painted symbols) in Louisiana Vodoun, much as in Haitian Vodou. Louisiana Vodoun’s primary liturgical language is English with a bit of French Creole.

    Often people mistake Hoodoo and Vodou. The differenced between them is simple. Vodou is a religion. Hoodoo is nothing more than Southern Folk Magic. Hoodoo uses the magical techniques of the Congo people of Africa without any of the religion. There is no presence of the nkisi, orishas, or lwa of Africa. In fact, most people who practice Hoodoo are Protestant Christians. You’ll see hoodoo workers also being called rootworkers or conjurers. They make magical charms called mojo bags, or jack balls. They’ll use magical powders, herbal cleansing baths, candles or lamps for spell work. All of this magical work is done while praying Psalms, praying to Jesus and God the Father, and reading from the Bible. While the vast majority of Hoodoo practitioners are Protestant Christians, there are some some Catholic practitioners who will petition Catholic saints. It’s important to note that they are petitioning the Saints themselves, not as a syncretized image for an African deity or spirit. So Hoodoo is not Voodoo.

    Santeria is a religion that evolved in Cuba. It is rooted in the African religious traditions of the Yoruba people (found in modern-day Nigeria). The followers of Santeria worship the orishas, the demi-gods of the Yorubapeople. While there is a veneer of Spanish Catholicism for the outsider, that element quickly drops away once a person has undergone initiation. The primary involvement of Catholic elements in Santeria are found in Espiritismo, a separate religious practice that has been deeply interwoven into Santeria as of the mid-1900’s. Santeria is highly initiatory, secretive and operates under strict religious rules. Participation in the religion is very limited to those who are not initiated and the great majority of participants are initiates. Santeria does NOT use veves or ornate drawn symbols to call the orishas as are done in Vodou (bullseye-style paintings called osun are used in certain rituals but bear no resemblance to veves). Santeria’s primary liturgical language is Lukumí, a late 1800’s dialect of the Yoruban language interspersed with elements of Cuban Spanish.

    -----------



    it's kinda like Jazz and Blues vs Traditional West African music...

    Jazz and Blues has West African roots...but at the end of the day...it uses a Western European scale...and has Western European concepts of musicality...at the highest level...we are talking about Western music not West African music, a Classical musician isn't looking at Jazz like it's a foreign thing.

    Hoodoo in my opinion is a very distinct American DOS folk magick and medicine that is inspired by West African folk practices and Christianity but it's not a religion unto itself. Whereas Louisiana Vodou is an American DOS West African religion with West African gods and etc. When I do a Hoodoo spell or ritual, I am still in a Judeo-Christian paradigm. Lord's prayer and all that. The rootwork is West African inspired though but it's without West African gods. It's not considered safe to incorporate West African gods without some initiation.

    The American slaves may have be largely illiterate but they had slave preachers and they still went to church...some of them knew how to read and the Bible was some of them only thing they were allowed to read. The Europeans didn't leave their occult traditions in Europe...they brought it with them. Europeans brought their Christian occultism and witchcraft with them too.

    The European folk magick part Hoodoo is just about some of the folk remedies are similar and the stories are similar and the methods are similar amongst Southern whites at that time who were Scott-Irish and etc. I don't think they are actually talking about a direct influence.

    This is a good discussion. I gotta shoot you my Quimbanda book, you'll like it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2019
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  11. $cam-U-Well_Jack$on

    $cam-U-Well_Jack$on All Star

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    Hoodoo/Conjure stems from Central Afrika, not West Afrika. Most was syncretized with Christian/Protestant beliefs. Louisiana "Voodoo" is complete & utter bullshyt and is largely used as a way to attract tourists. Ayisen Vodou as it evolved in da new world isn't da same as West Afrikan vodou. Hoodoo has nothing to do with nu'n European. That's a narative that's being pushed by white folks. A lot of them folks are Wiccans & Neo Pagans who make attempts to marginalize black folks in that tradition (Hoodoo). If your ancestors aren't black, then yeen Hoodoo. Lukumi & Abrahamic religions can be practiced side by side. Being mounted (possession) isn't da only way to work spirit in ATR's/DTR's and it damn sho' sum'n isn't that is chosen. It's a gift not everyone possesses, which is fine. "Spells" isn't a term often used in ATR's/DTR's but yes, it's something that is done.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
  12. $cam-U-Well_Jack$on

    $cam-U-Well_Jack$on All Star

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    I personally view Hoodoo as a DTR.
     
  13. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    [​IMG]

    The Times
    (Shreveport, Caddo, Louisiana, United States of America)
    14 Apr 1907, Sun • Page 19
     
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  14. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    [​IMG]

    The Times-Democrat
    (New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, United States of America)
    21 Sep 1894, Fri • Page 3
     
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  15. xoxodede

    xoxodede Superstar

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    [​IMG]

    The Times
    (Shreveport, Caddo, Louisiana, United States of America)
    12 May 1937, Wed • Page 16
     
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