Has Anyone Else Heard That The Roughest and Most Crude Slaves Went to Mississippi?

Discussion in 'The Locker Room' started by Dorian Gray, May 16, 2021.

  1. Dorian Gray

    Dorian Gray Superstar

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    I'm not going to lie, you put this in perspective. :pachaha:


    But the statements that I've heard about this came exclusively from other black people.
     
  2. KyokushinKarateMan

    KyokushinKarateMan Train hard, fight easy

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    “Rough” and “crude” slaves :gucci:
     
  3. BrothaZay

    BrothaZay Dicc ridin fakkit who loves the attention Supporter

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    How did slaves who never been down south hear about it?
     
  4. Dorian Gray

    Dorian Gray Superstar

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    @IllmaticDelta In your research, have you heard or come across this before?
     
  5. Get These Nets

    Get These Nets Veteran

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    Thanks for the info.

    In the 1619 Project essay about The Barbaric History of Sugar in America, Dr. Muhammad wrote


    ========
    In 1795, Étienne de Boré, a New Orleans sugar planter, granulated the first sugar crystals in the Louisiana Territory. With the advent of sugar processing locally, sugar plantations exploded up and down both banks of the Mississippi River. All of this was possible because of the abundantly rich alluvial soil, combined with the technical mastery of seasoned French and Spanish planters from around the cane-growing basin of the Gulf and the Caribbean — and because of the toil of thousands of enslaved people. More French planters and their enslaved expert sugar workers poured into Louisiana as Toussaint L’Ouverture and Jean-Jacques Dessalines led a successful revolution to secure Haiti’s independence from France.

    Within five decades, Louisiana planters were producing a quarter of the world’s cane-sugar supply. During her antebellum reign, Queen Sugar bested King Cotton locally, making Louisiana the second-richest state in per capita wealth. According to the historian Richard Follett, the state ranked third in banking capital behind New York and Massachusetts in 1840. The value of enslaved people alone represented tens of millions of dollars in capital that financed investments, loans and businesses. Much of that investment funneled back into the sugar mills, the “most industrialized sector of Southern agriculture,” Follett writes in his 2005 book, “Sugar Masters: Planters and Slaves in Louisiana’s Cane World 1820-1860.” No other agricultural region came close to the amount of capital investment in farming by the eve of the Civil War. In 1853, Representative Miles Taylor of Louisiana bragged that his state’s success was “without parallel in the United States, or indeed in the world in any branch of industry.”

    The enslaved population soared, quadrupling over a 20-year period to 125,000 souls in the mid-19th century. New Orleans became the Walmart of people-selling. The number of enslaved labor crews doubled on sugar plantations. And in every sugar parish, black people outnumbered whites. These were some of the most skilled laborers, doing some of the most dangerous agricultural and industrial work in the United States.

    In the mill, alongside adults, children toiled like factory workers with assembly-line precision and discipline under the constant threat of boiling hot kettles, open furnaces and grinding rollers. “All along the endless carrier are ranged slave children, whose business it is to place the cane upon it, when it is conveyed through the shed into the main building,” wrote Solomon Northup in “Twelve Years a Slave,” his 1853 memoir of being kidnapped and forced into slavery on Louisiana plantations.

    To achieve the highest efficiency, as in the round-the-clock Domino refinery today, sugar houses operated night and day. “On cane plantations in sugar time, there is no distinction as to the days of the week,” Northup wrote. Fatigue might mean losing an arm to the grinding rollers or being flayed for failing to keep up. Resistance was often met with sadistic cruelty.

    A formerly enslaved black woman named Mrs. Webb described a torture chamber used by her owner, Valsin Marmillion. “One of his cruelties was to place a disobedient slave, standing in a box, in which there were nails placed in such a manner that the poor creature was unable to move,” she told a W.P.A. interviewer in 1940. “He was powerless even to chase the flies, or sometimes ants crawling on some parts of his body.”

    Louisiana led the nation in destroying the lives of black people in the name of economic efficiency. The historian Michael Tadman found that Louisiana sugar parishes had a pattern of “deaths exceeding births.” Backbreaking labor and “inadequate net nutrition meant that slaves working on sugar plantations were, compared with other working-age slaves in the United States, far less able to resist the common and life-threatening diseases of dirt and poverty,” wrote Tadman in a 2000 study published in the American Historical Review. Life expectancy was less like that on a cotton plantation and closer to that of a Jamaican cane field, where the most overworked and abused could drop dead after seven years

    ======
     
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  6. IllmaticDelta

    IllmaticDelta Veteran

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    that's some made up BS:stopitslime:
     
  7. Dorian Gray

    Dorian Gray Superstar

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    Damn, that thought has certainly been around for a minute. :pachaha:
     
  8. keond

    keond Veteran Supporter

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    I always heard they sent slaves to a plantation in Charleston SC to break them. Not so incidentally, thats where the largest slave port in America was
     
  9. Dorian Gray

    Dorian Gray Superstar

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    Thanks. Didn't know this. It's funny how all these southern states, Virginia, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Mississippi all seemed to make the same claims as being the most powerful or wealthiest states in the south.
     
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  10. LurkMoar

    LurkMoar Veteran

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    Like breh earlier said it was more about getting their families split
     
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  11. Get These Nets

    Get These Nets Veteran

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    Thanks for the info.
    My original question was more about the region(s) of MS that the majority of Chi people have roots in.

    There was a thread about the Great Migration , and Alabama-to-Jersey came up. Newark,NJ had people from multiple places from the South, but a high % were from Southeast Alabama and bordering Southwest Georgia counties.
    NJ industries sent recruiters to specific areas.

    In keeping with the premise of the thread, was trying to see if a section of MS had been identified for being the place where a high % of MS to Chicago transplants arrived from.
    That group would have an outsize influence on every aspect of Chicago culture.
     
  12. Field Marshall Bradley

    Field Marshall Bradley Veteran

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    :mjlol:
     
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  13. Field Marshall Bradley

    Field Marshall Bradley Veteran

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    No it hasn't
     
  14. IllmaticDelta

    IllmaticDelta Veteran

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    a big portion of the black people in Chicago have Louisiana roots too, that's why Chicago was the first Northern hotbed for Jazz prior to 1920

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Seoul Gleou

    Seoul Gleou Superstar

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    they say the same thing about cacs that got shipped to australia. yet australia has less violence than most cac majority nations

    this topic is dumb anyway. whatever slaves felt was justfied, "crude" or otherwise. they were fukking slaves.
     
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