IT Certifications and Careers (Official Discussion Thread)

Sane

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I've worked in several but those jobs stink and are mostly outsourced to the lowest bidder these days. There are a ton of free or cheap training resources out there. Or you can just download trial versions of SIEM software and install it on a home lab setup. I frankly would only do this type of work for a few years and then get out. The turnover rate in these type of jobs is through the roof.




Damn is it that bad. :lupe:
I'm looking to get into cybersecurity, I thought SOC would be good entry point.
what didn't you like about SOC jobs?
 

Illmagic

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@Illmagic I haven't gotten a SOC role, really just helpdesk like ya self, but check out this YouTube channel https://youtube.com/c/TechTualChatter. I follow breh on Twitter, he pretty much went from the helpdesk to NOC and then SOC.

You can VMware workstation pro to have multiple VMs at home, but that can get pretty costly with RAM, memory etc. You could get a cheap desktop and use that as a server and then join all your laptops / other devices to that server. Suricata is a free option you could install, and you could even use Linux Server for your desktop.

You in school? At my community college, we have to take this work based learning class where we work with local companies on something dealing with/in our major & they were able to find me this Technology Support Specialist role at a local school, where I'm doing repairs, monitoring all devices on their network, training employees on cybersecurity, plus other little (free) projects I can think of.

Thanks Im def gonna check that channel out. Nah not in school anymore. I went years ago.
 

JT-Money

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Damn is it that bad. :lupe:
I'm looking to get into cybersecurity, I thought SOC would be good entry point.
what didn't you like about SOC jobs?
Most companies with a SOC don't know what the fukk their doing. You end up staring at the same alerts everyday and performing the same repetitive tasks over and over.

These companies aren't going to make any real changes to secure the environment. And will task the SOC with the impossible task of stopping every attack. Despite the fact nobody else in the company could give a shyt about security. You'll mostly end up on an island with no real resources or power in the organization. Working yourself to death for people who will turn around and blame you when they get owned. Plus they don't usually pay shyt.
 

StretfordRed

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Currrently doing forensics consulting for a major big player company, it’s and these places aren’t all what they’re drummed up to be.

I think I’m going back to a smaller focused company. Experiences some racism and shytty managers too. They definitely don’t make the place hospitable.

I been talking to a few guys and gals who left and complained about the cliques and they have similar issues.

Another huge issue of cliques in cyber security are military cliques. Dudes be cramming chats with stories of military gigs and people outside
Of the US/military circle are just like :unimpressed:

Anyway, CV freshened. Time to get interviewing again
 
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Mirin4rmfar

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Damn is it that bad. :lupe:
I'm looking to get into cybersecurity, I thought SOC would be good entry point.
what didn't you like about SOC jobs?

Here is my perspective, you get in where you can man. I have been working in a soc for close to 4 years now. It was the best move for me because I lacked experienced. I was rejected a million times before I landed a soc role(senior role at that).

If you want to work in a SOC, find a big MSSP. They manage fws, endpoints, ips and perform security analyst etc. for hundreds of clients. and have the manpower. You see so many issues and change request that you get lots of exposure. They will also pay for your certifications so you can take advantage and move on.

********************************************

I would not work at so and so companies soc unless it is a major company like AT&T, Verizon etc. You need manpower, these smaller companies dont have it so they outsource it to MSSPs. It's impossible to know everything. Some clients I talk to, they do it all with and when shyt go wrong, they are under stress by upper management. They don't give a shyt you exist until shyt goes wrong and don't see the hundreds of issues you have resolved.

My only complaints has been rude clients but I have only had to deal with that like 3-4 times. The other thing is Customer Success Managers and PMs can be a pain in the ass when clients call them. They put unnecessary pressure on technical resources.

Company I work is moving away from that side of the business but it was a good experience for me. A lot of people have moved on some technical work, some project managers, some become risk management , sales engineer, systems engineers etc. lol who knows where I will end up but I dont want to be in the soc forever:mjlol:. There is this team all they do is pull reports from clients, go over their vulnerabilties, tell them this is their most critical, do some research online and go home n fridays at 2:00, 3:00 pm lol. So they Cyber Security doesn't have to be stressful.

*************************************
 
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Most companies with a SOC don't know what the fukk their doing. You end up staring at the same alerts everyday and performing the same repetitive tasks over and over.

These companies aren't going to make any real changes to secure the environment. And will task the SOC with the impossible task of stopping every attack. Despite the fact nobody else in the company could give a shyt about security. You'll mostly end up on an island with no real resources or power in the organization. Working yourself to death for people who will turn around and blame you when they get owned. Plus they don't usually pay shyt.
Also some of them use custom software so you're not even learning anything like wireshark which is crucial, SOC is a dead end job.
 

JT-Money

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Truefan31

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So a family member is about to graduate with an undergraduate in cybersecurity. Any ideas on the best paths for him?
 

Truefan31

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Did he do any internships?

He hasn’t yet. He’s still about a year away from graduating. Just trying to help fam out with the best path. I know a degree isn’t the end all be all in the IT world but maybe he can get his foot in the door somewhere and start getting certs?

He’s kinda tryin to figure out the best path. He’s young (22). He even thought about the military after college and/or getting security clearance.

Any ideas on possible internships?
 

Mirin4rmfar

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He hasn’t yet. He’s still about a year away from graduating. Just trying to help fam out with the best path. I know a degree isn’t the end all be all in the IT world but maybe he can get his foot in the door somewhere and start getting certs?

He’s kinda tryin to figure out the best path. He’s young (22). He even thought about the military after college and/or getting security clearance.

Any ideas on possible internships?

He should apply for internships. I would aim for companies like Deloitte, KPMG, PWC, McKinsey, Bain, EY, Accenture, Booz Allen Hamilton, Amazon, Google etc. The key is to give yourself the best career start possible with companies where there will be lots of growth potential and ability to move around. At least that's what I would do if I was fresh out of college now that I know better

Also, he can look into cyber security development programs.

These programs are typically 3-4 years. If he is agressive, get all the key certs while in the program by 26 he can hit six figures easy. They key is to start at good companies.

Honestly, even if he has to start at a smaller company, by year 1, I would have aimed for the companies above.
 

Truefan31

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He should apply for internships. I would aim for companies like Deloitte, KPMG, PWC, McKinsey, Bain, EY, Accenture, Booz Allen Hamilton, Amazon, Google etc. The key is to give yourself the best career start possible with companies where there will be lots of growth potential and ability to move around. At least that's what I would do if I was fresh out of college now that I know better

Also, he can look into cyber security development programs.

These programs are typically 3-4 years. If he is agressive, get all the key certs while in the program by 26 he can hit six figures easy. They key is to start at good companies.

Honestly, even if he has to start at a smaller company, by year 1, I would have aimed for the companies above.

That’s great info appreciate it. I take it most of these companies out there have a cybersecurity internship/development program to get in the door?
 

Slic Ric

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Why are recruiters (not even actual client) HELL bent on video calling recruits? :mjpls: :dame:
 
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