Igbo influence in Black American culture

audemarzz

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It does make you think, out of all of the diaspora, African Americans rarely acknowledge the African influence.

Just like the Banjo. They take credit for it, but never talk about it's African roots. :russ:
That's a lie Goofy Canadian nikka, you and that african @You Got Mossed are really some sensitive hoes.
 

Samori Toure

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It's like this thread a few weeks ago about the history of BBQing. They just rarely acknowledge their influences to the point you would think they birthed themselves.
Did black people invent American BBQ?

Just noticing now. Even look how Samori is up in there showing his ass. Which further proves my point.:russ:

Which proves further your point what? I guess that your dumb ass didn't bother to read my specific post in there regarding the Hausa people; now did you? :russ:

Trying show a nikka up at least get the shyt right:

"But the word “barbecue” has other roots, as well. The West African Hausa people used the word “babbake” to refer to a variety of processes involving cooking and fire. This explanation has a lot going for it. Particularly, the fact that a single word with myriad meanings came to define a past-time that is as fraught with ambiguity today as its origins in the distant past... ."

History of Barbecue | Community | MAK Grills

Did black people invent American BBQ?

But this goes to a bigger point. This shows how stupid people are when it comes to African Americans. One of the most important and best selling books in American history is called "Roots."

546018.jpg


It gave rise to one of the most watched television mini series and whole college curriculums in the USA. The story is about a Black man that traced his maternal great, great, great grandfather back to the Mandinka people. Every Black American that I ever met has watched that show or read the book. But let you nikkas tell it Black Americans don't acknowledge Africa.
 

Tom Foolery

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Which proves further your point what? I guess that your dumb ass didn't bother to read my specific post in there regarding the Hausa people; now did you? :russ:

Trying show a nikka up at least get the shyt right:

"But the word “barbecue” has other roots, as well. The West African Hausa people used the word “babbake” to refer to a variety of processes involving cooking and fire. This explanation has a lot going for it. Particularly, the fact that a single word with myriad meanings came to define a past-time that is as fraught with ambiguity today as its origins in the distant past... ."

History of Barbecue | Community | MAK Grills

Did black people invent American BBQ?

But this goes to a bigger point. This shows how stupid people are when it comes to African Americans. One of the most important and best selling books in American history is called "Roots."

546018.jpg


It gave rise to one of the most watched television mini series and whole college curriculums in the USA. The story is about a Black man that traced his maternal great, great, great grandfather back to the Mandinka people. Every Black American that I ever met has watched that show or read the book. But let you nikkas tell it Black Americans don't acknowledge Africa.
I get it. You birthed yourself.

Thank you for proving my point.
 

Samori Toure

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I get it. You birthed yourself.

Thank you for proving my point.

I don't even know what point your are trying to make and worse you don't even know what point you are trying to make. You are just swinging in the dark.

Oh and don't think that I didn't notice that you went right by my comments on the book "Roots." So you are not going to acknowledge that you were wrong about African Americans?
 

JadeB

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OP reaching like a mfer

Igbo is one ethnic group in the state of Nigeria. There were slaves imported from all over West and Central Africa. Literally hundreds, if not thousands, of ethnic groups.

Someone sounding real ethno-centric :mjpls:

This topic would best be approached with a Pan-Africanist perspective - rather than an ethnocentrist one focusing exclusively on one ethnic group in a country with over 250 other ethnic groups.
:hubie:I'm not Igbo, I just stumbled int to this article and I found it really interesting
 

JadeB

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Which proves further your point what? I guess that your dumb ass didn't bother to read my specific post in there regarding the Hausa people; now did you? :russ:

Trying show a nikka up at least get the shyt right:

"But the word “barbecue” has other roots, as well. The West African Hausa people used the word “babbake” to refer to a variety of processes involving cooking and fire. This explanation has a lot going for it. Particularly, the fact that a single word with myriad meanings came to define a past-time that is as fraught with ambiguity today as its origins in the distant past... ."

History of Barbecue | Community | MAK Grills

Did black people invent American BBQ?

But this goes to a bigger point. This shows how stupid people are when it comes to African Americans. One of the most important and best selling books in American history is called "Roots."

546018.jpg


It gave rise to one of the most watched television mini series and whole college curriculums in the USA. The story is about a Black man that traced his maternal great, great, great grandfather back to the Mandinka people. Every Black American that I ever met has watched that show or read the book. But let you nikkas tell it Black Americans don't acknowledge Africa.
I thought the word "barbeque" and the cooking process was indigenous. Specifically Taino.
 

JadeB

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Mashed potatoes and stewed okra?

:mjtf:

Idk about this breh. Those are not staple AA foods. Those dishes are Southern white American foods.
I don't know either. I stumbled into article and thought it was interesting. I think breh is an Igbo writer.
 

sunny80

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I don't know either. I stumbled into article and thought it was interesting. I think breh is an Igbo writer.
He's misinformed. He's confusing southern white food with southern black food. Black and white southern foods overlap sometimes but not mashed potatoes and stewed okra. Those are white creations.
 

Tom Foolery

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I don't even know what point your are trying to make and worse you don't even know what point you are trying to make. You are just swinging in the dark.

Oh and don't think that I didn't notice that you went right by my comments on the book "Roots." So you are not going to acknowledge that you were wrong about African Americans?
I'll tell you my point as quick as possible

This is what you post
"But the word “barbecue” has other roots, as well. The West African Hausa people used the word “babbake” to refer to a variety of processes involving cooking and fire. This explanation has a lot going for it. Particularly, the fact that a single word with myriad meanings came to define a past-time that is as fraught with ambiguity today as its origins in the distant past... ."

This is the article in full context
Look up any web article on “the history of barbecue” and you’re likely to get statements to the effect that the word “barbecue” comes to us from the Caribbean by way of Spanish Conquistadors who learned of slow-cooking over a fire using a wooden frame from the Taino-Arawak people. The Spanish adopted the Haitian word barbacoa meaning “sacred fire pit” to describe this process and have used it since at least 1526, when it first appeared in a Spanish dictionary. Many attribute the origin of the modern word “barbecue” to the word barbacoa. It is equally likely that the word “barbecue” stems from the Taino-Arawak word “barbicu.” The Taino people inhabit what is today Hispaniola, the island home of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. What you won’t read quite as often is that the meats of choice were goat, deer, alligator, and possibly human. Sacred fire pit, indeed.

But the word “barbecue” has other roots, as well. The West African Hausa people used the word “babbake” to refer to a variety of processes involving cooking and fire. This explanation has a lot going for it. Particularly, the fact that a single word with myriad meanings came to define a past-time that is as fraught with ambiguity today as its origins in the distant past.

The fact is, salting, spicing and slow roasting meat is a nearly universal process, and one valuable worldwide not just to those in search of perfect flavor, but to those looking for ways to preserve meat in unforgiving climates. But what about American barbecue? Is it possible something so closely identified with our national culture is shared by every culture on earth?

Yes and no. Slow cooking over a controlled fire belongs exclusively to no one. However, what we call barbecue in the United States is ours, albeit by way of the West Africans, Jamaicans, and Haitians brought to our shores against their will. The story of American barbecue has its roots, like all things American, in many cultures, yet it was one of the most marginalized and mistreated that gave us the gift that so many love.

Barbecue in the United States, as almost anyone will tell you, is peculiarly Southern. And in the South, pork was the meat of choice. This stems back to the earliest continental colonies, specifically a failed Spanish colony founded in 1526 in what would become South Carolina. When their leader died and the colony foundered, the pigs they’d brought with them from the Old World ended up in the wild. The slaves of the Spaniards were taken in by the local Native American tribes, and together they hunted and barbecued the feral pigs (which still haunt the Southern forests).

This early American barbecue was cooked in pits dug by hand and covered with green wood. It was slow cooking extraordinaire, and very labor intensive. As time went on, slow cooking meat was adopted more and more by poor rural populations, and came to be the staple of festivals and celebrations. Black slaves in particular perfected the practice, and took it with them wherever they went. Eventually, their manner of eating—usually without utensils—was accepted by the European settlers who also grew to appreciate the flavor and consistency of slow roasted meat.

Very selective and protected, almost dismissive on influences.

If were to say Jamaica influenced American BBQ, I'd get killed here. But there it is, in your article. :pachaha:
 
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